3 Things Companies Using Cloud Computing Should Make Sure Their Employees Do - ParkMyCloud

3 Things Companies Using Cloud Computing Should Make Sure Their Employees Do

These days, there’s a huge range of companies using cloud computing, especially public cloud. While your infrastructure size and range of services used may vary, there are a few things every organization should keep in mind. Here are the top 3 we recommend for anyone in your organization who touches your cloud infrastructure.

Keep it Secure

OK, so this one is obvious, but it bears repeating every time. Keep your cloud access secure.

For one, make sure your cloud provider keys don’t end up on GitHub… it’s happened too many times.

(there are a few open source tools out there that can help search your GitHub for this very problem, check out AWSLabs’s git-secrets).

Organizations should also enforce user governance and use Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) to ensure that only the people who need access to specific resources can access them.

Keep Costs in Check

There’s an inherent problem created when you make computing a pay-as-you-go utility, as public cloud has done: it’s easy to waste money.

First of all, the default for computing resources is that they’re “always on” unless you specifically turn them off. That means you’re always paying for it.

Additionally, over-provisioning is prevalent – 55% of all public cloud resources are not correctly sized for their resources. The last is perhaps the most brutal: 15% of spend is on resources which are no longer used. It’s like discovering that you’re still paying for that gym membership you signed up for last year, despite the fact that you haven’t set foot inside. Completely wasted money.

In order to keep costs in check, companies using cloud computing need to ensure they have cost controls in place to eliminate and prevent cloud waste – which, by the way, is the problem we set out to solve when we created ParkMyCloud.

Keep Learning

Third, companies should ensure that their IT and development teams continue their professional development on cloud computing topics, whether by taking training courses or attending local Meetup groups to network with and learn from peers. We have a soft spot in our hearts for our local AWS DC Meetup, which we help organize, but there are great meetups in cities across the world on AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, and more.

Best yet, go to the source itself. Microsoft Azure has a huge events calendar, though AWS re:Invent is probably the biggest. It’s an enormous gathering for learning, training, and announcements of new products and services (and it’s pretty fun, too).

We’re a sponsor of AWS re:Invent 2017 – let us know if you’re going and would like to book time for a conversation or demo of ParkMyCloud while you’re there, or just stop by booth #1402!


About Jay Chapel

Jay Chapel is the CEO and co-founder of ParkMyCloud. After spending several years in the cloud management space, Jay saw that there was no simple solution to the problem of wasted cloud spend - which led him to start ParkMyCloud in 2015. Before that, he spent 10+ years with Micromuse and IBM Tivoli, a provider of business infrastructure management software. After an acquisition by IBM, he led the successful sales integration and subsequent growth of the IBM Tivoli/Netcool business in Europe. He also held several regional and worldwide sales roles in Switzerland, the UK and the US. Jay earned both a BA in Finance and an MBA from West Virginia. Those few hours a month that Jay’s not busy with ParkMyCloud’s growth and success, you can find him on the ski slopes, on the soccer field, or on the golf course often accompanied by his three kids.

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