Was the Cloudyn Acquisition to Manage Microsoft Azure? Sort of.

Was the Acquisition of Cloudyn About the need to Manage Microsoft Azure? Sort of.

Manage microsoft azure

Perhaps you heard that Microsoft recently acquired Cloudyn in order to manage Microsoft Azure cloud resources, along with of course Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP), and others. Why? Well the IT landscape is becoming more and more a multi-cloud landscape. Originally this multi-cloud (or hybrid cloud) approach was about private and public cloud, but as we recently wrote here the strategy as we talk to large enterprises is becoming more about leveraging multiple public clouds for a variety of reasons – risk management, vendor lock in, and workload optimization seem to be the three main reasons.

 

That said, according to TechCrunch and quotes from Microsoft executives the acquisition is meant to provide Microsoft a cloud billing and management solution that provides it with an advantage over competitors (particularly AWS and GCP) as companies continue to pursue, drum roll please … a multi-cloud strategy. Additional, benefits for Microsoft include visibility into usage patterns, adoption rates, and other cloud-related data points that they can leverage in the ‘great cloud war’ to come … GOT reference of course.

 

Why are we writing about this – a couple reasons. One of course is that this a relevant event in the cloud management platform (CMP) space, as this is really the first big cloud visibility and governance acquisition to date. The other acquisitions by Dell (Enstratius), Cisco (Cliqr), and CSC (ServiceMesh) for example were more orchestration and infrastructure platforms than reporting tools. Second, this points to the focus enterprises have on cost visibility, cost management and governance as they look to optimize their spend and usage as one does with any utility. And third, this proves that a ‘pushback’ from enterprises to more widely adopt Azure has been, “I am already using AWS, I don’t want to manage through yet another screen / console”, and that multi-cloud visibility and governance helps solve that problem.

 

Now, taking this one step farther: the visibility, recommendations, and reporting are all well and good, but what about the actions that must be taken off those reports, and integration into enterprise Devops processes for automation and continuous cost control? That’s where something like Cloudyn falls short, and where a platform like ParkMyCloud kicks in:

 

  • Multi-cloud Visibility and Governance- check
  • Single-Sign On (SSO) – check
  • REST API for DevOps Automation – check
  • Policy Engine for Automated Actions (parking) – check
  • Real-time Usage and Savings data – check
  • Manage Microsoft Azure (AWS + GCP) – check

 

The next step in cloud cost control is automation and action, not just visibility and reporting. Let technology automate these tasks for you instead of just telling you about it.


About Jay Chapel

Jay Chapel is the CEO and co-founder of ParkMyCloud. After spending several years in the cloud management space, Jay saw that there was no simple solution to the problem of wasted cloud spend - which led him and co-founder Dale Wickizer to start ParkMyCloud in 2015. Before that, he spent 10+ years with Micromuse and IBM Tivoli, a provider of business infrastructure management software. After an acquisition by IBM, he led the successful sales integration and subsequent growth of the IBM Tivoli/Netcool business in Europe. He also held several regional and worldwide sales roles in Switzerland, the UK and the US. Jay earned both a BA in Finance and an MBA from West Virginia. Those few hours a month that Jay’s not busy with ParkMyCloud’s growth and success, you can find him on the ski slopes, on the soccer field, or on the golf course often accompanied by his three kids.

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