Google Hangouts & Microsoft Teams Integrations for Cloud Server Monitoring

New in ParkMyCloud: we’ve released integrations with chat clients Google Hangouts and Microsoft Teams to make cloud server monitoring easier and integrated into your day. Now, ParkMyCloud users can get notifications when their resources are about to turn on or off, when a user overrides a schedule, and more.

We created these integrations based on popular demand! ParkMyCloud has had a Slack integration since last summer. Now, we’re encountering more and more teams that set themselves up as pure Google or pure Microsoft shops, hence the need. If your team only uses Google tools – Google Cloud Platform for cloud, Google OAuth for SSO, and Google Hangouts for chat — you can use ParkMyCloud with all of these. Same with Microsoft: ParkMyCloud integrates with Microsoft Azure, ADFS, and Microsoft Teams.  

ParkMyCloud notifications in Google Hangouts – note the “view resource” link will take you straight to the resource in ParkMyCloud

Here’s what actions ParkMyCloud admins can get notified on through a chat client for better cloud server monitoring:

  • Resource Shutdown Warning – Provides a 15-minute warning before an instance is scheduled to be parked due to a schedule or expiring schedule override.
  • User Actions – These are actions performed by users in ParkMyCloud such as manual resource state toggles, attachment or detachment of schedules, credential updates, etc.
  • Parking Actions – These are actions specifically related to parking such as automatic starting or stopping of resources based on defined parking schedules.
  • Policy Actions – These are actions specifically related to configured policies in ParkMyCloud such as automatic schedule attachments based on a set rule.
  • System Errors – These are errors occurring within the system itself such as discovery errors, parking errors, invalid credential permissions, etc.
  • System Maintenance and Updates – These are the notifications provided via the banner at the top of the dashboard.

There are a few ways these can be useful. If you’re an IT administrator and you see your users toggling resource states frequently, the notifications may help you determine the best parking schedule for the users’ needs.

Or let’s say you’re a developer deep in a project and you get a notification that your instance is about to be shut down — but you still need that instance while you finish your work. Right in your Microsoft Teams window, you can send an override command to ParkMyCloud to keep the instance running for a couple more hours.

ParkMyCloud notifications in Microsoft Teams

These integrations give ParkMyCloud users a better perspective into cloud server monitoring, right in the same workspaces they’re using every day. Feedback? Comment below or shoot us an email – we are happy to hear from you!

P.S. We also just created a user community on Slack! Feel free to join here for cloud cost, automation, and DevOps discussions.

Cloud User Management Comparison: AWS vs. Azure vs. GCP vs. Alibaba Cloud

Cloud User Management Comparison: AWS vs. Azure vs. GCP vs. Alibaba Cloud

When companies move from on-prem workloads to the cloud, common concerns arise around costs, security, and cloud user management. Each cloud provider handles user permissions in a slightly different way, with varying terminology and roles available to assign to each of your end users. Let’s explore a few of the differences in users and roles within Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, and Alibaba Cloud.

AWS IAM Users and Roles

AWS captures all user and role management within IAM, which stands for “Identity and Access Management”. Through IAM, you can manage your users and roles, along with all the permissions and visibility those users and service accounts have within your AWS account. There are a couple different IAM entities:

  • Users – used when an actual human will be logging in
  • Roles – used when service accounts or scripts will be interacting with resources

Both users and roles can have IAM policies attached, which give specific permissions to operate or view any of the other AWS services.

Azure RBAC

Azure utilizes the RBAC system within Resource Manager for user permissions, which stands for “Role Based Access Control”. Granting access to Azure resources starts with creating a Security Principal, which can be one of 3 types:

  • User – a person who exists in Azure Active Directory
  • Group – a collection of users in Azure Active Directory
  • Service Principal – an application or service that needs to access a resource

Each Security Principal can be assigned a Role Definition, which is a collection of permissions that they can utilize to view or access resources in Azure. There are a few built-in Role Definitions, such as Owner, Contributor, Reader, and User Access Administrator, but you can also create custom role definitions as well depending on your cloud user management needs.  Roles may be assigned on a subscription by subscription basis.

Google Cloud Platform IAM

Google Cloud Platform also uses the term IAM for their user permissions. The general workflow is to grant each “identity” a role that applies to each resource within a project. An identity can be any of the following:

  • Google account – any user with an email that is associated with a Google account
  • Service account – an application that logs in through the Google Cloud API
  • Google group – a collection of Google accounts and service accounts
  • G Suite domain – all Google accounts under a domain in G Suite
  • Cloud Identity domain – all Google accounts in a non-G-Suite organization

Roles in Google Cloud IAM are a collection of permissions. There are some primitive roles (Owner, Editor, and Viewer), some predefined roles, and the ability to create custom roles with specific permissions through an IAM policy.

Alibaba Cloud RAM

Alibaba Cloud has a service called RAM (Resource Access Management) for managing user identities. These identities work in slightly different ways than the other cloud service providers, though they have similar names:

  • RAM-User – a single real identity, usually a person but can also be a service account
  • RAM-Role – a virtual identity that can be assigned to multiple real identities

RAM users and roles can have one or more authorization policies attached to them, which in turn can each have multiple permissions in each policy. These permissions then work similarly to other CSPs, where a User or Role can have access to view or act upon a given resource.

Cloud User Management – Principles to Follow, No Matter the Provider

As you can see, each cloud service provider has a way to enable users to access the resources they need in a limited scope, though each method is slightly different. Your organization will need to come up with the policies and roles you want your users to have, which is a balancing act between allowing users to do their jobs and not letting them break the bank (or your infrastructure). The good news is that you will certainly have the tools available to provide granular access control for your cloud user management, regardless of the cloud (or clouds) you’re using.

4 Cloud Computing Jobs to Check Out if You Want to Break Into the Space

4 Cloud Computing Jobs to Check Out if You Want to Break Into the Space

Lately, we’ve been thinking about cloud computing jobs and titles we’ve been seeing in the space. One of the great things about talking with ParkMyCloud users is that we get to talk to a variety of different people. That’s right – even though we’re laser-focused on cloud cost optimization, it turns out that can matter to a lot of different people in an organization. (And no wonder, given the size of wasted spend – that hits people’s’ buttons).

You know the cloud computing market is growing. You know that means new employment opportunities, and new niches in which to make yourself valuable. So what cloud computing jobs should you check out?

If you are a sysadmin or ops engineer:

Cloud Operations. Cloud operations engineers, managers, and similar are the people we speak with most often at ParkMyCloud, and they are typically the cloud infrastructure experts in the organization. This is a great opportunity for sysadmins looking to work in newer technology.

If you’re interested in cloud operations, definitely work on certifications from AWS, Azure, Google, or your cloud provider of choice. Attend meetups and subscribe to industry blogs – the cloud providers innovate at a rapid pace, and the better you keep up with their products and solutions, the more competitive you’ll be.

See also: DevOps, cloud infrastructure, cloud architecture, and IT Operations.

If you like technology but you also like working with people:

Customer Success, cloud support, or other customer-facing jobs at a managed service provider (MSP). As we recently discussed, there’s a growing market of small IT providers focusing on hybrid cloud in the managed services space. The opportunities at MSPs aren’t limited to customer success, of course – just in the past week we’ve talked to people with the following titles at MSPs: Cloud Analyst, Cloud Engineer, Cloud Champion/Cloud Optimization Engineer, CTO, and Engagement Architect.

Also consider: pre-sales engineering at one of the many software providers in the cloud space.

If you love process:

Site Reliability Engineer. This title, invented by Google, is used for operations specialists who focus on keeping the lights on and the sites running. Job descriptions in this discipline tend to focus on people and processes rather than around the specific infrastructure or tools.  

If you have a financial background:

Cloud Financial Analyst. See also: cloud cost analyst, cloud financial administrator, IT billing analyst, and similar. Cloud computing jobs aren’t just for technical people — there is a growing field that allows experts to adapt financial skills to this hot market. As mentioned above, since the cloud cost problem is only going to grow, IT organizations need professionals in financial roles focused on cloud. Certifications from cloud providers can be a great way to stand out.

What cloud computing jobs are coming next?

As the cloud market continues to grow and change, there will be new cloud computing job opportunities – and it can be difficult to predict what’s coming next. Just a few years ago, it was rare to meet someone running an entire cloud enablement team, but that’s becoming the norm at larger, tech-forward organizations. We also see a trend of companies narrowing in “DevOps” roles to have professionals focused on “CloudOps” specifically — as well as variations such as DevFinOps. And although some people hear “automation” and worry that their jobs will disappear, there will always be a need for someone to keep the automation engines running and optimized. We’ll be here.

Multi-Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Cloud Spend – Statistics on Cloud Computing

Multi-Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Cloud Spend – Statistics on Cloud Computing

The latest statistics on cloud computing all point to multi-cloud and hybrid cloud as the reality for most companies. This is confirmed by what we see in our customers’ environments, as well as by what industry experts and analysts report. At last week’s CloudHealth Connect18 in Boston we heard from Dave Bartoletti, VP and Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, who broke down multi-cloud and hybrid cloud by the numbers:

  • 62% of public cloud adopters are using 2+ unique cloud environments/platforms
  • 74% of enterprises describe their strategy as hybrid/multi-cloud today
  • But only:
    • 42% regularly optimize cloud spending
    • 41% maintain an approved service catalog
    • 37% enforce capacity limits or expirations

More often than not, public cloud users and enterprises have adopted a multi-cloud or hybrid cloud strategy to meet their cloud computing needs. Taking advantage of features and capabilities from different cloud providers can be a great way to get the most out of the benefits that cloud services can offer, but if not used optimally, these strategies can also result in wasted time, money, and computing capacity.

The data is telling – but we won’t stop there. For more insight on the rise of multi-cloud and hybrid cloud strategies, and to demonstrate the impact on cloud spend (and waste) – we have compiled a few more statistics on cloud computing.

Multi-Cloud and Hybrid Cloud Adoption Statistics

The statistics on cloud computing show that companies not only use multiple clouds today, but they have plans to expand multi- and hybrid cloud use in the future:

  • According to a 451 Research survey, 69% of organizations plan to run a multi-cloud environment by 2019. As they said, “the future of IT is multi-cloud and hybrid” – but with this rise, cloud spending optimization also becomes more of a challenge.
  • In a survey of nearly 1,000 tech executives and cloud practitioners, over 80% of companies were utilizing a multi-cloud strategy, commonly including a hybrid cloud model consisting of both public and private clouds.
  • And by multi-cloud, we don’t mean just two. On average, the number of private and public clouds used by companies to run applications and test out new services is 4.8.
  • On hybrid cloud strategy:
    • 83% of workloads are virtualized today (IDC)
    • 60% of large enterprises run VMs in the public cloud (IDC)
    • 65% of organizations have a hybrid cloud strategy today (IDC)

Cloud Spend Statistics

As enterprises’ cloud footprints expand, so too does their spending:

  • It’s not just public – the rise in cloud spend is happening on all fronts. According to IDC, 62.3 percent of private cloud spending went to on-premise private clouds in 2017.
  • The increase in cloud use, along with the rise of multi-cloud and hybrid cloud strategies, also correlates with an increased investment in cloud services. In a survey of nearly 1,000 tech executives and cloud practitioners, 20% of enterprises plan to increase their cloud spend by more than double, and another 17% plan to up their cloud spending by 50-100%, according to the report.  
  • 75% of participants said that one of their primary concerns was the challenge of managing cloud spend. Cloud cost optimization was a priority for the majority of participants, and average cloud waste was reported at 35%.
  • In another study from 451 Research, 38.8% of CIOs said that “cost savings” was their biggest motivator in migrating to the cloud, but post migration, cloud costs was the biggest challenge they faced. Here’s what else they had to say:

“Cloud is an inexpensive and easily accessible technology. People consume more, thereby spending more, and forget to control or limit their consumption. With ease of access, inevitably some resources get orphaned with no ownership; these continue to incur costs. Some resources are overprovisioned to provide extra capacity as a ‘just in case’ solution. Unexpected line items, such as bandwidth, are consumed. The IT department has limited visibility or control of these items.”

What Does ParkMyCloud User Data Tell Us?

We’ve noticed some interesting patterns in the cloud platforms adopted by ParkMyCloud users as well, which highlight the multi-cloud trends discussed above as well as correlations between the types of companies that are attracted to each of the major public clouds. We observed:

  • A high rate of growth in the number of Google Cloud Platform (GCP) customers over the past several months. While Amazon Web Services still holds the lion’s share among organizations using ParkMyCloud, the rate of growth is much higher for GCP. We believe that as more and larger organizations become enmeshed in GCP’s infrastructure, they are finding a greater need for cost optimization.
  • Among our customers using a multi-cloud strategy, the majority use AWS in combination with Azure, while the rest are using AWS with Google Cloud Platform.
  • The adoption model for AWS and GCP users are similar – both allow small to medium business to start small and adopt quickly, while still supporting the largest companies in the world. On the other hand, Azure customers tend to adopt through Enterprise License Agreements. We encounter few startups using Azure.

What These Statistics on Cloud Computing Mean for Cloud Management  

Upon examining these statistics on cloud computing, it’s clear that multi-cloud and hybrid cloud approaches are not just the future, they’re the current state of affairs. While this offers plenty of advantages to organizations looking to benefit from different cloud capabilities, using more than one CSP complicates governance, cost optimization, and cloud management further as native CSP tools are not multi-cloud. As cloud costs remain a primary concern, it’s crucial for organizations to stay ahead with insight into cloud usage trends to manage spend (and prevent waste). To keep costs in check for a multi-cloud or hybrid cloud environment, optimization tools that can track usage and spend across different cloud providers are a CIO’s best friend.

The Cloud Managed Services Market is Growing – and That’s Good for MSPs

The Cloud Managed Services Market is Growing – and That’s Good for MSPs

Lately, we have been talking to quite a few providers of cloud managed services that play in both the private and public cloud spaces. These conversations have centered around how cloud management needs are evolving as enterprises’ hybrid and multi-cloud needs have accelerated.

Most refer to this market as cloud managed services (for once, no acronym associated), and many of these managed service providers (MSPs) also sell migration services to bring customers from private to public cloud, and cloud services between Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Platform (GCP). So these MSPs can help you move your applications to the cloud, sell you the cloud services you’re using, and manage and optimize your cloud services. It’s a rapidly growing market with a lot of M&A activity as MSPs race to provide differentiated cloud managed services that enable them to help enterprises get to market faster, better, and cheaper.

The global cloud managed services market size is expected to reach USD 82.51 billion by 2025, according to a study conducted by Grand View Research, Inc. Enterprises are focusing on their primary business operations, which results in higher cloud managed services adoption. Business services, security services, network services, data center services, and mobility services are major categories in the cloud managed services market. Implementation of these services will help enterprises reduce IT and operations costs and will also enhance the productivity of those enterprises.

Taking a step back, I had a look at Wikipedia to make sure we were all aligned on what managed services provider are and cloud management is (cloud managed services):

  • A managed services provider is most often an information technology (IT) services provider that manages and assumes responsibility for providing a defined set of services to its clients either proactively or as the MSP (not the client) determines that services are needed.
  • Cloud management means the software and technologies designed for operating and monitoring applications, data and services residing in the cloud. Cloud management tools help ensure cloud computing-based resources are working optimally and properly interacting with users and other services.

Cloud managed services enable organizations to augment competencies that they lack, or to replace functions or processes that incurred huge recurring costs. These services optimize recurring in-house IT costs, transform IT systems and automate business processes allowing enterprises to achieve their business objectives.

The “net net” is that MSPs providing managed cloud services enable enterprises to adopt and manage their cloud services more efficiently.

In March 2018 Gartner published a Magic Quadrant for Public Cloud Infrastructure Managed Service Providers if your interested to see who they rank as the best of the best in when implementing and operating solutions on AWS, Azure and GCP (note this includes multi-cloud but not hybrid cloud). Several large SI’s are on the list like Accenture, Capgemini, and Deloitte, along with newer born in the cloud pure play MSPs like 2ndWatch, Cloudreach and REANcloud.

What’s interesting to us about this list is the recent M&A activity we have seen with many of these companies, here’s a few we were able to remember over a beer (shout out to Crooked Run Brewery in Sterling, VA):

As you can see, there is a clear bias towards buying “born in the cloud”, public cloud focused MSPs, as that’s where the lack of enterprise expertise lies, and of course the hyper growth is occurring as companies migrate from private to public cloud. Many of these providers started off supporting just AWS, and now need to or have begun supporting Azure and Google as well to support The “big 3” cloud service providers in this new, and emerging multi-cloud world.

MSPs that want to get into the cloud managed services game need to realize the pains are different in the public cloud, and that their focus needs to be on helping enterprises with security and governance, managing cloud spending, the lack of resources/expertise, and the ability to manage multi-cloud.

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