SaaS  vs. PaaS vs. IaaS – Where the Market is Going

SaaS vs. PaaS vs. IaaS – Where the Market is Going

SaaS, PaaS, IaaS – these are the three essential models of cloud services to compare, otherwise known as Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). Each of these has its own benefits, and it’s good to understand why providers offer these different models and what implications they have for the market. While SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS are different, they are not competitive – most software-focused companies use some form of all three. Let’s take a look at these main categories, and because I like to understand things by company name, I’ll include a few of the more common SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS providers in market today.

SaaS: Software as a Service

Software as a Service, also known as cloud application services, represents the most commonly utilized option for businesses in the cloud market. SaaS utilizes the internet to deliver applications, which are managed by a third-party vendor, to its users. A majority of SaaS applications are run directly through the web browser, and do not require any downloads or installations on the client side.

Prominent providers: Salesforce, ServiceNow, Google Apps, Dropbox and Slack (and ParkMyCloud, of course).

PaaS: Platform as a Service

Cloud platform services, or Platform as a Service (PaaS), provide cloud components to certain software while being used mainly for applications. PaaS delivers a framework for developers that they can build upon and use to create customized applications. All servers, storage, and networking can be managed by the enterprise or a third-party provider while the developers can maintain management of the applications.

Prominent providers and offerings: AWS Elastic Beanstalk, RedHat Openshift, IBM Bluemix, Windows Azure, and VMware Pivotal CF.

IaaS: Infrastructure as a Service

Cloud infrastructure services, known as Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), are made of highly scalable and automated compute resources. IaaS is fully self-service for accessing and monitoring things like compute, storage, networking, and other infrastructure related services, and it allows businesses to purchase resources on-demand and as-needed instead of having to buy hardware outright.

Prominent Providers: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure (Azure), Google Cloud Platform (GCP), and IBM Cloud.

SaaS vs. PaaS vs. IaaS

SaaS, PaaS and IaaS are all under the umbrella of cloud computing (building, creating, and storing data over the cloud). Think about them in terms of out-of-the-box functionality and building from the bottom up.

IaaS helps build the infrastructure of a cloud-based technology. PaaS helps developers build custom apps via an API that can be delivered over the cloud. And SaaS is cloud-based software companies can sell and use.

Think of IaaS as the foundation of building a cloud-based service — whether that’s content, software, or the website to sell a physical product, PaaS as the platform on which developers can build apps without having to host them, and SaaS as the software you can buy or sell to help enterprises (or others) get stuff done.

SaaS, PaaS, IaaS Market Share Breakdown

The SaaS market is by far the largest market, according to a Gartner study that reported that enterprises spent $182B+ on cloud services, with SaaS services making up 43% of that spend.

While SaaS is currently the largest cloud service in terms of spend, IaaS is currently projected to be the fastest growing market with a CAGR of 20% plus over the next 3 to 4 years. This bodes very well for the “big three” providers, AWS, Azure and GCP.

Where the Market is Going

What’s interesting is that many pundits argue that PaaS is the future, along with FaaS, DaaS and every other X-as-a-service. However, the data shows otherwise. As evidenced by the reports from Gartner above, IaaS has a larger market share and is growing the fastest.

First of all, this is because IaaS offers all the important benefits of using the cloud such as scalability, flexibility, location independence and potentially lower costs. In comparison with PaaS and SaaS, the biggest strength of IaaS is the flexibility and customization it offers. The leading cloud computing vendors offer a wide range of different infrastructure options, allowing customers to pick the performance characteristics that most closely match their needs.

In addition, IaaS is the least likely of the three cloud delivery models to result in vendor lock-in. With SaaS and PaaS, it can be difficult to migrate to another option or simply stop using a service once it’s baked into your operations. IaaS also charges customers only for the resources they actually use, which can result in cost reductions if used strategically. While much of the growth is from existing customers, it’s also because more organizations are using IaaS across more functions than either of the other models of cloud services.

AWS Lambda Pricing: Low, But Unpredictable

AWS Lambda Pricing: Low, But Unpredictable

Today’s entry into our exploration of public cloud prices focuses on AWS Lambda pricing.

Low costs are often cited as a benefit of using serverless. A recent survey showed that companies saved an average of 4 developer workdays per month by adopting serverless, and 21% of companies reported cost reduction as a main benefit. But why aren’t 100% of companies reporting cost savings?

In this article, we’ll take a look at the Lambda pricing model, and some things you need to keep in mind when estimating costs for serverless infrastructure.

How AWS Lambda Pricing Works

Core Pricing

AWS Lambda pricing is based on what you use. There are two major factors that contribute to the calculation of “what you use”:

  • Requests — Lambda counts a request each time it starts executing in response to an event notification or invoke call. Each request costs $0.0000002.
  • Duration — Duration is calculated from the time your code begins executing until it returns or otherwise terminates, rounded up to the nearest 100ms. But, the price is not charged per second. Rather, it is charged per GB-second, which is the duration in seconds multiplied by the maximum memory size in GB. Every GB-second costs $0.0000166667.

Free Tier

There is a free tier available to all Lambda users — and note that this is unrelated to your regular AWS free tier usage. Every user gets 1 million requests per month and 400,000 GB-Seconds per month, for free.

Additional Charges

In addition to requests and duration, you will also be charged for additional AWS services used  or data transfers – regardless of whether you’re using Lambda’s free tier. For many applications, API requests and data transfers will cost significantly more than the AWS Lambda core pricing.

Why AWS Lambda Pricing is So Confusing

Ultimately, Lambda pricing is confusing and hard to predict. Here’s why:

  • Granularity — the fact that cost is per each function execution makes it difficult to estimate compared to server-based pricing models. Thinking in terms of iterations of a microservices script requires some mental gymnastics.
  • Multiplicative costs — the fact that the duration charges are based on a calculation makes it harder to conceptualize and more variable than other pricing models – and if both duration and memory change, the costs increase quickly.
  • Additional charges at a cost of $3.50 per million calls, AWS API Gateway charges often make up a significant portion of the cost to run serverless – plus data transfers and other “on top” costs.
  • Wait time — if a function makes an outgoing call and sits idle waiting for the result, you’ll be charged for the wait time. Be sure to set a maximum function execution time to prevent this from driving up costs (as well as a maximum memory size).
  • Code maintenance it’s a murkier area when it comes to costs, but with more functions come more lines of code to maintain.

Of course, there are several AWS Lambda pricing calculators out there to help estimate costs — ranging from the simpler that include only the number of executions, memory allocation, and average duration (examples from Dashbird and A Cloud Guru) to those incorporating language, activity patterns, and EC2 comparisons from the cheekily named servers.lol.

AWS Lambda Costs Are Just One Factor

There are plenty of benefits to serverless, from low latency to scalability to simple deployment. However, alongside vendor lock-in, applications with long or variable execution times, and control over application performance, cost is another reason why serverless may not replace traditional servers for all situations.

Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) – The Leader in Hosted Container Orchestration

Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) – The Leader in Hosted Container Orchestration

One of Google Cloud’s killer products is Google Kubernetes Engine, or GKE. Since Google was the original creator of the Kubernetes container scheduler, it’s fitting that they are considered to be at the forefront of Kubernetes management and development. In spite of the fact that Kubernetes is now managed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Google is still a major contributor to the open-source Kubernetes project on Github. Let’s take a look at Google’s hosted version of Kubernetes and why so many cloud users prefer it to the competition.

GKE Overview

Google Kubernetes Engine is a hosted environment that can run your containerized applications. Unlike Google Compute Engine, which lets you run virtual machines with the operating system of your choice, Google Kubernetes Engine takes your application or code that is packaged into a Docker container and manages it according to your specifications. Ideally, the same containers that have gone through your testing and QA process can now be run at-scale in production, with the backing of Google’s security, availability, and management.

GKE was made publically available in 2015, after being used behind-the-scenes for many Google services (like Gmail and YouTube) for over 10 years. After open-sourcing the Kubernetes software, Google set up a hosted version so users didn’t have to worry about running the master node themselves. This hosted master node has built-in high availability, health checks, and an easy-to-use developer dashboard.

GKE manages Virtual Machines that containers are running on by using their own container-optimized OS. These VMs can scale up or down based on container load and application requirements, and can even utilize preemptible VMs for batch or low-priority jobs. The pricing of GKE is based solely on the number of seconds that those compute resources exist, as there’s no additional costs for the Kubernetes masters that you run for the clusters.

GKE vs. The Competition (AKS, EKS, and ECS)

Google Kubernetes Engine is often seen as the leader in hosted Kubernetes environments, both because Google wrote the original software, and because a decade of experience running it on some of the largest scale websites in the world is hard to discount. Google also had a two-year head start on Microsoft’s AKS service and a three-year head start on Amazon’s AKS platform, which helped work out the kinks and build brand awareness. More: cloud container services comparison.

There are also some technical reasons why GKE is a superior choice. Google deploys the latest version of Kubernetes faster than other providers, so you’re always on the bleeding edge of development. Clusters typically spin up faster, more nodes are allowed per cluster, and new workers start quicker. SOC and ISO compliance can be a factor for large organizations. The user experience of the Kubernetes dashboard is also noticeably better than some alternatives.

You Down With GKE? (Yeah, You Know Me)

At the end of the day, the biggest question we get asked about services like Google Kubernetes Engine is, “Should I use Google Kubernetes Engine for my containers?” As always, the answer is nuanced. If you aren’t embedded in a particular cloud provider (or if you have a multi-cloud strategy), then GKE is certainly a step above other hosted Kubernetes services. Throw in the fact that you don’t pay for master nodes, and it makes financial sense as well. However, if you’re fully committed to a different cloud provider, then the native container management tools are good enough to get the job done.

ParkMyCloud is Now Part of Turbonomic

ParkMyCloud is Now Part of Turbonomic

I am excited to announce that ParkMyCloud is now part of Turbonomic! This is great news for our customers, partners, and our team that I’ve been looking forward to sharing with you.

Why Turbonomic? Simply put, they are the experts in our space. Launched in 2009, Turbonomic is one of the fastest-growing technology companies in the virtualization and cloud management space. Thousands of high-profile, technology-forward enterprises – including PWC, Expedia, and J.P. Morgan – use the platform to maximize the value of their IT investments. If you want smart analytics for optimization, there’s nowhere better to go than Turbonomic (Just look at the PhD count on the team!) The Turbonomic platform provides customers with hybrid cloud elasticity through top-down application resource management, which is absolutely essential for the twin goals of hybrid cloud: performance and efficiency.

Why ParkMyCloud? Since day 1, we at ParkMyCloud have been optimizing costs for public cloud customers through automation. Like Turbonomic, we share a passion for analytics-driven automation, which our platform applies by helping cloud customers to reduce costs by 65%, improve governance, and save time by eliminating manual tasks — all while being easy to use and adopt. Our two organizations have these goals in common for cloud users, and by bringing ParkMyCloud onboard, Turbonomic has validated our mission and is enabling us to do even more for our customers.

What will change for our customers? Actually, not much! You’ll get to keep using the same ParkMyCloud platform you use today. The boon for you is that with Turbonomic backing our team, we’ll be able to innovate and iterate on the platform more quickly, to continually provide you with a better experience, a broader feature set, and of course, more savings.

An optimized future. Together with Turbonomic, we look forward to continuing to provide the best in multi-cloud optimization and analytics-driven automation for our customers, no matter where you are on your cloud journey.

One thing our Turbo colleagues have already taught us is that the correct answer to the question “what’s your favorite color?” is “green”. That seems fitting in a number of ways: applications running, everything working, money saved.

Most of all, green means “go” – let’s do it.

Why Serverless Won’t Replace Traditional Servers

Why Serverless Won’t Replace Traditional Servers

Curious why serverless is so popular – and why it won’t replace traditional servers in the cloud?

In the current cloud infrastructure, top service providers are dedicating a great deal of effort to expand on this architecture as a new approach to a cloud solution that focuses on applications rather than infrastructure. Today we’ll take a look at what serverless computing is good for, and what it can’t replace.

Understanding Serverless

For starters, serverless mostly refers to an application or API that depends on third-party, cloud-hosted applications and services, to manage server-side logic and state, propagating code hosted on Function as a Service (FaaS) platforms.

Even though the name “serverless” suggests that there are no servers involved, there will always be servers in use. Rather, it makes it so developers don’t have to deal directly with the servers – it is more about the implementation and management of them. To power serverless workloads,  cloud providers use automated systems that eliminate the need for server administrators, offering developers a way to manage applications and services without having to handle, tweak or scale the actual server infrastructure.

Top Serverless Providers

It is no surprise the top cloud providers that are investing in a major way on serverless include AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud. In brief, here is how they approach serverless computing.

AWS Lambda is the current leader among serverless compute implementations. Lambda handles everything by automatically scaling your application by running your code as it’s triggered.

Microsoft Azure Functions enables you to run code-on-demand without having to explicitly provision or manage infrastructure.

Google Cloud Functions is a compute solution for creating event-driven applications and connects with GCP services by listening for and responding to events without needing to provision or manage servers.

Advantages and When to Use Serverless

Let’s look at why serverless is often a good choice. It allows organizations to reduce operational complications associated with infrastructure and related cost expenditures since they are computed for the actual usage or work the serverless platform performs.

When it comes to implementing, maintaining, debugging, monitoring the infrastructure, and setting up your environment, with serverless the heavy lifting is done for you. It allows developers to focus on application development, and not complex infrastructures, thus promoting team efficiency, better serving the customers and focusing on business goals.

Since serverless cost models are based on execution only, using serverless will reduce your costs of operations and save you money on cloud spend, making it more adaptable for short-term tasks on your environment, however, there are hidden costs to be aware of. Though we are considering advantages, this might as well be a disadvantage. Serverless apps rely on API calls, and the heavy use of API request can become very pricey indeed. In addition, networking costs can get very expensive when sending a lot of data and are generally more difficult to track in serverless costs models.

Some of the best use cases for serverless are:

  • Brand new applications that don’t already have an existing workload
  • Microservices-based architectures, with small chunks of code working together
  • Infrequently-used scripts that don’t need a server running 24/7

Disadvantages and When Not to Use Serverless

No doubt, there is an increased interest in serverless, but there are limitations that come with it. Perhaps these trade-offs are the reasons as to why some companies, though interested in serverless, are not ready to make the jump from traditional servers just yet.

Networking on serverless must be done through a private API endpoint and cannot be accessed through IPs, which can lead to vendor lock-in. This makes serverless unsuitable for long-term tasks, making serverless unusable for applications that have variable execution times, and for services that require information from an external source.

Serverless creates dependency upon cloud providers, and because of this you are not able to port your applications between different providers. Cloud providers own the burden of resource provisioning, so they are solely responsible for ensuring that the application instance has the back-end infrastructure it needs to execute when summoned.

By adopting serverless, you forfeit complete control over your infrastructure, like for example, scaling. Scaling is done automatically, but the absence of control makes it difficult to address and migrate errors related to serverless instances. This lack of control also applies to application performance issues, a metric that developers still need to worry about in a serverless environment. After all, serverless providers depend on an actual server that needs to be accessed and monitored.

Serverless is likely not a good fit for:

  • Rewriting existing apps
  • Applications with variable execution times
  • Long-term tasks
  • Monolithic applications

Why Serverless Won’t Replace Traditional Servers

Though every business has different needs when it comes to cloud infrastructures, serverless won’t surmount the current cloud infrastructure of traditional servers completely. There are too many use cases where serverless is not applicable, or not worth the tradeoff in control (or perhaps the cost – stay tuned for a future post on this). But as cloud service providers continue to invest heavily on serverless, it is fair to say that serverless usage will continue to grow in the years to come.  

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