New ParkMyCloud “RightSizing” Automates Resource Resizing for Cloud Cost Savings

New ParkMyCloud “RightSizing” Automates Resource Resizing for Cloud Cost Savings

Enterprises Can Reduce Spend by 75% with Data-Driven Optimization

May 30, 2019 (Dulles, VA) – ParkMyCloud, provider of the leading enterprise platform for continuous cost control in public cloud, has announced that its platform now recommends resource “RightSizing” changes for cost optimization on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP). These changes can save up to 75% on oversized instances and databases.

The problem posed by oversized resources is significant. ParkMyCloud data shows that 95% of resources under the platform’s management are operating at less than 50% average CPU, showing patterns of significant underutilization and overprovisioning. Moving a virtual machine size down one tier will save 50%. Many instances are so overprovisioned that changes by two or more tiers make more sense, allowing for 75% or higher savings. Users can also save money by modernizing instances. The cloud providers incentivize instance modernization by pricing the newest generations the lowest.

RightSizing joins ParkMyCloud’s “parking” functionality, which automatically schedules non-production cloud resources, such as those used for development, testing, staging, and QA, to turn off when they’re not needed. With a typical schedule that parks a resource for 12 hours each night and on weekends, users can save 65% of the cost of their resources. Combined with rightsizing, this means that an average cloud user is poised to reduce overall costs in their cloud environment from 50-80% or more.

“Not only can rightsizing provide significant savings, but it takes the burden of tedious and murky decisions off the shoulders of users,” said ParkMyCloud Founder Jay Chapel. “The real advantage for enterprise cloud users is automation.”

To get started, public cloud users should visit www.parkmycloud.com/free-trial to start a free 14-day trial of the product and to receive their own RightSizing recommendations.

About ParkMyCloud

ParkMyCloud provides an easy-to-use platform that helps enterprises automatically identify and eliminate wasted cloud spend. More than 1,000 enterprises around the world – including Unilever, Sysco, Hitachi ID Systems, Sage Software, and National Geographic – trust ParkMyCloud to cut their cloud spend by millions of dollars annually. ParkMyCloud’s SaaS offering allows enterprises to easily manage, govern, and optimize their spend across multiple public clouds. For more information, visit www.parkmycloud.com.

Contact

Katy Stalcup, ParkMyCloud

kstalcup@parkmycloud.com

Trends in Cloud Jobs In 2019

Trends in Cloud Jobs In 2019

Trends in cloud jobs can be overall indicators into trends in the cloud computing space. With an ever-evolving and increasing use of cloud services, new and important changes are needed to the skillsets, roles, and responsibilities of cloud professionals. Here are some trends we’re seeing.

The Cloud Job Market is on the Rise

There is exponential growth in the cloud computing industry, so it’s no surprise that the demand for cloud computing intellect and skills is also increasing, with no slowing down in the foreseeable future. According to Gartner TalentNeuron, an online real-time labor market insight portal, “there are about 50,248 cloud computing positions available in the U.S. from 3,701 employers, and 101,913 open positions worldwide.”

As more and more enterprises drive value from container platforms, infrastructure-as-code solutions, software-defined networking, storage, continuous integration/delivery, and AI, they need people and skills on board with ever more niche expertise and deep technological understanding. Anecdotally, many organizations we talk to share that getting and keeping talent on board is a challenge as they seek to evolve their use of cloud services. The cloud jobs that are available in the market today are a result of employer demand to drive innovation and are paramount for new business applications and services to the end-user.

Cloud Talent Demand Trends

Here are a few roles and talent areas that will see increased demand this year.

Cloud Architect

Cloud Architects are experts responsible for the supervision of a company’s cloud computing system, overseeing the organization’s cloud computing strategy through deployment, management, and support of cloud applications. A Cloud Architect has a strong background in networking, programming, multiple operating systems, and security. In addition, they also have a strong knowledge of cloud services such as AWS, Google or Azure, with experience on ITSM, I&O, governance, automation, and vendor management. Here at ParkMyCloud, we talk to a lot of Cloud Architects!

Cloud Architects are also known as Cloud Developer or Cloud Systems Administrator. When it comes to getting hired, an AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate, Microsoft Certified: Azure Solutions Architect Expert or Google Certified Professional Cloud Architect certification are currently the industry standard to help you emerge above the rest in this cloud job arena.  

Cloud Consultants

Cloud consultants are “the experts” who can help an organization conduct an overall technical analysis and assessment of the enterprise and recommend suitable cloud technology options to promote productivity and efficiency. A Cloud Consultant’s education background includes IT or business administration, IT consulting experience and highly effective communication skills. A Cloud Consultant’s expert knowledge of cloud service providers and cloud technologies available is key to provide maximum value to an enterprise.

You may find of interest, cloud computing careers relatable to Cloud Consultants include Cloud Security Engineers, Cloud Operations Engineers, and Cloud Infrastructure Engineers. An educational path to becoming a Cloud Consultant ranges from studying different programming languages to getting certified – although not necessarily required – in a single or multi-cloud computing systems.

Business Intelligence Analyst

A BI analyst has strong skills in database technology, analytics, and reporting tools and excellent knowledge and understanding of computer science, information systems or engineering. Skills necessary to understand a company’s cloud needs through data interpretation and be able to collate and cogently communicate cloud-based services and cloud strategy solutions to drive actionable results. An important role in the cloud management of businesses as demand for data and data analysts increases. BI analyst will collaborate with many individuals in the  IT department in an organization to maximize proficiency and productivity.

BI Analyst can also be described as BI Developers, BI Managers, and Big Data Engineer or Data Scientist. To work in BI, you do not need to be certified, but it may help you get an advantage when considered for a job, with certifications like Certified Business Intelligence Professional and Certified Application Associate: Business Intelligence.

IoT Engineer

An internet of things (IoT) engineer is an IT professional who is an expert in at least one or more of the core IoT disciplines: devices, connectivity, edge and cloud analytics, enterprise integration, platforms, and development and DevOps. Job titles for IoT engineers in the industry depend on the discipline they focus on, for example, the can be called IoT Architect, IoT Data Scientist or IoT Hardware Engineer, but all have in common an in-depth knowledge in specific subject matters of IoT in comparison to other engineers, making them the right person when it comes to decision making regarding the specific IoT subject matter. The main responsibility of IoT engineers is to help businesses keep up with IoT technology trends.

According to Gartner, “By 2022, 80% of leading I&O organizations will devise I&O strategies for digital business initiatives such as artificial intelligence and IoT.”  And, if you have any doubt that this is important in the cloud space, just see how many of AWS’s new services this year are IoT-focused.

The Future of Cloud Computing Jobs

In today’s trends in cloud computing jobs, if you’re looking to get involved in cloud for the first time, check out these 4 Cloud Computing Jobs to Check Out If You Want to Break Into the Space. Or, perhaps consider these interesting cloud job titles we came across for the future:  

  • Data Detective
  • Master of Edge Computing
  • Cyber City Analyst
  • Man-Machine Teaming Manager
  • Quantum Machine Learning Analyst

Cloud computing growth continues to accelerate at unprecedented rates as businesses continue to invest in cloud services like SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS. The adoption of cloud technology  platforms, empowers businesses with unlimited possibilities for innovation, but in order to stay at pace with this innovation and the dizzying array of services being offered by Amazon, Microsoft, Google, IBM  all businesses will need skilled resources offering cloud computing professionals a very promising career in the cloud industry for years to come.

What trends are you seeing? Let us know in the comments below.

New: RightSizing Recommendations for AWS and Google Cloud

New: RightSizing Recommendations for AWS and Google Cloud

Today, we’re happy to share the latest in cost optimization: ParkMyCloud now makes RightSizing recommendations for your resources in AWS and Google Cloud.

Optimize Your Cloud Infrastructure with Automated RightSizing

Choosing the right instance type for cloud resources is difficult. The major providers offer a huge range of options, each optimized for different capabilities, and a variety of sizes within each instance family. It can be hard to predict in advance what you’ll need. And indeed, our data shows that 95% of instances are operating at less than 50% average CPU – that is to say, most of them are oversized.

Why does it matter? Oversizing is a huge waste of money. Downsizing by one instance size saves 50% of the cost – and two sizes down saves 75%. You can also save money by modernizing instances. The cloud providers incentivize instance modernization by pricing the newest generations the lowest.

ParkMyCloud will not only recommend but also help you take action to resize your instances, move families, and/or modernize as needed so that you can optimize performance with the lowest cost.

What Else is New?

We’re always enhancing and improving ParkMyCloud to make it work best for you. Here’s what else is new:

What’s up next? Azure RightSizing, scheduled resizing and optimization for container services.

How to Get Started

If you’re new to ParkMyCloud, you’ll want to start with a 14-day free trial. Once you connect to your cloud provider, you’ll be able to start managing your instances. You’ll have access to the full set of Enterprise Tier features for the length of the trial, and after 14 days you can choose the free tier or a more advanced tier.  

To enable RightSizing, both new and current users should contact us as this feature is currently in beta. Once that’s active, go to the Recommendations screen and select the RightSizing tab to see all sizing recommendations, which you can then click to apply. The resource will be resized the next time it’s restarted. It’s that easy!

How AWS Firecracker Makes Containers and Serverless More Efficient

How AWS Firecracker Makes Containers and Serverless More Efficient

AWS Firecracker was announced at AWS re:Invent in November 2018 as a new AWS open source virtualization technology. The technology is purpose-built for creating and managing secure, multi-tenant container and function-based services. It was described by the AWS Chief Evangelist Jeff Barr as “what a virtual machine would look like if it was designed for today’s world of containers and functions.”

What is AWS Firecracker?

Firecracker is a Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) exclusively designed for running transient and short-lived processes. In other words, it helps to optimize the running of functions and serverless workloads. It’s also an important new component in the emerging world of serverless technologies and is used to enhance the backend implementation of Lambda and Fargate. Firecracker helps deliver the speed of containers combined with the security of VMs. If you use Lambda or Fargate, you’re already receiving the benefits of Firecracker. However, if you run/orchestrate a large volume of containers, you should take a look at this service with optimization in mind.

How AWS Firecracker Creates Efficiencies

AWS can realize the economic benefits of Firecracker by creating what they call “microVMs”, which allows them to spread serverless workloads around multiple servers thus getting a greater ROI from its investment in the servers behind serverless. In terms of customer benefit, using Firecracker enables these new microVMs to launch in 125 milliseconds or less, compared to the seconds (or longer) it can take to launch a container or spin up a traditional virtual machine. In a world where thousands of VMs can be spun up and down to tackle a specific workload, this will constitute a significant savings. And remember, these are fully fledged micro virtual machines, not just containers.The micro VM’s themselves are worth a closer look as each includes an in-process rate limiter to optimize shared network and storage resources. As a result, one server can support thousands of microVMs with widely varying processor and memory configurations.\

There is also the enhanced security and workload isolation only available from Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVMs) – more secure than containers, which are less isolated. One particularly valuable security feature is that Firecracker is statically linked, which means all the libraries it needs to run are included in its executable code. This makes new Firecracker environments safer by eliminating outside libraries. Altogether, this offering and the combination of efficiency, security and speed created quite the buzz at the AWS re:Invent launch.

Will Firecracker make a “bang”?

There are a few caveats related to the still novel aspects of the technology. In particular, compared to alternatives, such as containers or Hyper-V VMs, it is prudent to confine to non-production workloads as the technology is still new and needs to be more fully battle-tested for production use.

However, as confidence, adoption, and experience grow in the use of serverless technologies it certainly seems like Firecracker can offer a popular new method for provisioning compute resources and will likely help bridge the current gap between VMs and containers.

SaaS  vs. PaaS vs. IaaS – Where the Market is Going

SaaS vs. PaaS vs. IaaS – Where the Market is Going

SaaS, PaaS, IaaS – these are the three essential models of cloud services to compare, otherwise known as Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). Each of these has its own benefits, and it’s good to understand why providers offer these different models and what implications they have for the market. While SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS are different, they are not competitive – most software-focused companies use some form of all three. Let’s take a look at these main categories, and because I like to understand things by company name, I’ll include a few of the more common SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS providers in market today.

SaaS: Software as a Service

Software as a Service, also known as cloud application services, represents the most commonly utilized option for businesses in the cloud market. SaaS utilizes the internet to deliver applications, which are managed by a third-party vendor, to its users. A majority of SaaS applications are run directly through the web browser, and do not require any downloads or installations on the client side.

Prominent providers: Salesforce, ServiceNow, Google Apps, Dropbox and Slack (and ParkMyCloud, of course).

PaaS: Platform as a Service

Cloud platform services, or Platform as a Service (PaaS), provide cloud components to certain software while being used mainly for applications. PaaS delivers a framework for developers that they can build upon and use to create customized applications. All servers, storage, and networking can be managed by the enterprise or a third-party provider while the developers can maintain management of the applications.

Prominent providers and offerings: AWS Elastic Beanstalk, RedHat Openshift, IBM Bluemix, Windows Azure, and VMware Pivotal CF.

IaaS: Infrastructure as a Service

Cloud infrastructure services, known as Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), are made of highly scalable and automated compute resources. IaaS is fully self-service for accessing and monitoring things like compute, storage, networking, and other infrastructure related services, and it allows businesses to purchase resources on-demand and as-needed instead of having to buy hardware outright.

Prominent Providers: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure (Azure), Google Cloud Platform (GCP), and IBM Cloud.

SaaS vs. PaaS vs. IaaS

SaaS, PaaS and IaaS are all under the umbrella of cloud computing (building, creating, and storing data over the cloud). Think about them in terms of out-of-the-box functionality and building from the bottom up.

IaaS helps build the infrastructure of a cloud-based technology. PaaS helps developers build custom apps via an API that can be delivered over the cloud. And SaaS is cloud-based software companies can sell and use.

Think of IaaS as the foundation of building a cloud-based service — whether that’s content, software, or the website to sell a physical product, PaaS as the platform on which developers can build apps without having to host them, and SaaS as the software you can buy or sell to help enterprises (or others) get stuff done.

SaaS, PaaS, IaaS Market Share Breakdown

The SaaS market is by far the largest market, according to a Gartner study that reported that enterprises spent $182B+ on cloud services, with SaaS services making up 43% of that spend.

While SaaS is currently the largest cloud service in terms of spend, IaaS is currently projected to be the fastest growing market with a CAGR of 20% plus over the next 3 to 4 years. This bodes very well for the “big three” providers, AWS, Azure and GCP.

Where the Market is Going

What’s interesting is that many pundits argue that PaaS is the future, along with FaaS, DaaS and every other X-as-a-service. However, the data shows otherwise. As evidenced by the reports from Gartner above, IaaS has a larger market share and is growing the fastest.

First of all, this is because IaaS offers all the important benefits of using the cloud such as scalability, flexibility, location independence and potentially lower costs. In comparison with PaaS and SaaS, the biggest strength of IaaS is the flexibility and customization it offers. The leading cloud computing vendors offer a wide range of different infrastructure options, allowing customers to pick the performance characteristics that most closely match their needs.

In addition, IaaS is the least likely of the three cloud delivery models to result in vendor lock-in. With SaaS and PaaS, it can be difficult to migrate to another option or simply stop using a service once it’s baked into your operations. IaaS also charges customers only for the resources they actually use, which can result in cost reductions if used strategically. While much of the growth is from existing customers, it’s also because more organizations are using IaaS across more functions than either of the other models of cloud services.

Want tips, tricks, and insights for an optimized cloud?

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