7 Ways to Get Azure Credits

7 Ways to Get Azure Credits

Azure credits are a perk offered by Microsoft that help you save money on your cloud bill. Like a gift card for a retail store, credits are applied to your account to help cover costs until they are exhausted or expire. In a sense, these credits act as a spending limit because any usage of resources or products that are not free will be deducted from the credit amount. We found 7 different ways that you can earn credits and start saving on your Azure bill. 

1. Visual Studio Subscription

If you’re a Visual Studio subscriber, you get monthly Azure credits that can be used to explore and test out different Azure services. The amount of Azure credits that you receive will depend on the type of Visual Studio subscription that you have. 

With a Visual Studio Enterprise subscription, you get a standard of $150 in monthly credits. For subscriptions through MSDN Platforms you get $100 a month. For Visual Studio Professional and Visual Studio Test Professional, you get $50 a month. 

2. Azure for Students

Full-time students at an accredited, two or four-year educational institution in a STEM-related field are eligible for these credits. 

When a student signs up with their school email address, Microsoft gives them $100 in credit in order to help them further their career and build their skills in Azure thanks to the free access to learning paths, labs, and professional developer tools. 

3. Azure Free Account

With a free account, you get access to a number of popular Azure services for no cost. In addition to access to free services, you’ll also get a $200 credit. It’s important to note that while the free account lasts for 12 months, your credits must be spent in the first 30 days. 

Whether you’re just getting started in Azure or are looking to further your knowledge, a free account is always a great way to test the waters without having to make a long term commitment.

4. Microsoft Partner Network

In the Partner Network, those that are members of Microsoft’s Action Pack program receive $100 of Azure credits every month. Based on your computing needs, you can use these credits for any Azure service; some examples include, Virtual Machines, Web Sites, Cloud Services, Mobile Services, Storage, SQL Database, Content Delivery Network, HDInsight, Media Services, and more.

The great part about this is that there are a handful of usage scenarios that won’t consume all of the $100 credit – you can use this pricing calculator to estimate how much you could use with a $100 credit.

Any of the unused monthly credits can’t be carried over to succeeding months or transferred to other Azure subscriptions, so make sure to use it while you can!

5. Microsoft for Startups

This global program is designed to help startups as they build and scale their organizations. Part of the technical enablement features that are always free and available to all startups is $200 of Azure credits that can be used towards any service for 30 days. This is a great option for startups because it’s free and gives you the ability to explore all the different offerings without having to spend any money. 

6. Azure for Education

With Azure for Education, users are given access to the learning resources and developer tools that educators and students need in order to build cloud-based skills. This program is available to students, educators and institutions – once signed up, educators get $200 of Azure credits.

Whether you’re teaching advanced workloads, interested in building cloud-based skills, or just getting started in your Azure learning journey, this program provides guidance and resources for individuals looking to further their knowledge in Azure.

7. Microsoft for Nonprofits

In an effort to make their technology more affordable and accessible for nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations, Microsoft offers donated and discounted products. Each year, approved organizations receive $3,500 in Azure credits which can be used to purchase all Azure workloads created by Microsoft (excluding Azure Active Directory, which is licensed under EM+S).

No matter the industry you’re in or learning level you’re at, there are a wide variety of credits and resources offered that can help make Azure an affordable option for you.

 

Further Reading:

Top 3 Ways to Save Money on Azure

How to Save Money with Microsoft Azure Enterprise Agreements

9 Ways to Get AWS Credits

4 Ways to Get Google Cloud Credits

7 Favorite AWS Training Resources

7 Favorite AWS Training Resources

When it comes to AWS training resources, there’s no shortage of information out there. Considering the wide range of videos, tutorials, blogs, and more, it’s hard knowing where to look or how to begin. Finding the best resource depends on your learning style, your needs for AWS, and getting the most updated information available. Whether you’re just getting started in AWS or consider yourself an expert, there’s an abundance of resources for every learning level. With this in mind, we came up with our 7 favorite AWS training resources, sure to give you the tools you need to learn AWS:

1. AWS Self-Paced Labs

What better way to learn that at your own pace? AWS self-paced labs give you hands-on learning in a live AWS environment, with AWS cloud services, and actual scenarios you would encounter in the cloud. There are two different ways to learn with these labs. You can either take an individual lab or follow a learning quest. Individual labs are intended to help users get familiar with an AWS service as quickly as 15 minutes. Learning quests guide you through a series of labs so you can master any AWS scenario at your own pace. Once completed, you will earn a badge that you can boast on your resume, LinkedIn, website, etc. 

Whatever your experience level may be, there are plenty of different options offered. Among the recommended labs you’ll find an Introduction to Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), and for more advanced users, a lab on Maintaining High Availability with Auto Scaling (for Linux).

2. AWS Free Tier

Sometimes the best way to learn something is by jumping right in. With the AWS Free Tier, you can try AWS services for free. This is a great way to test out AWS for your business, or for the developers out there, to try services like AWS CodePipeLine, AWS Data Pipeline, and more. While you are still getting a hands-on opportunity to learn a number of AWS services, the only downside is that there are certain usage limits. You can track your usage with a billing alarm to avoid unwanted charges, or you can try ParkMyCloud and park your instances when they’re not in use so you get the most out of your free tier experience. In fact, ParkMyCloud started its journey by using AWS’s free tier!

3. AWS Documentation and Whitepapers

AWS Documentation is like a virtual encyclopedia of tools, terms, training, and everything AWS. You’ll find case studies, tutorials, cloud computing basics, and so much more. This resource is a one-stop-shop for all of your AWS documentation needs, whether you’re a beginner or advanced user. No matter where you are in your AWS training journey, AWS documentation is always a useful reference and certainly deserves a spot in your bookmarks. 

Additionally, you’ll find whitepapers that give users access to technical AWS content that is written by AWS and individuals from the AWS community, to help further your knowledge of their cloud. These whitepapers include things from technical guides, reference material, and architecture diagrams.

4. YouTube

So far, we’ve gone straight to the source for 3 out of 7 of our favorite AWS training resources. Amazon really does a great job of providing hands-on training, tutorials, and documentation for users with a range of experience. However, YouTube opens up a whole new world of video training that includes contributions from not only Amazon, but other great resources as well. Besides the obvious Amazon Web Services channel, there are also popular and highly rated videos by Edureka, Simplilearn, Eli the Computer Guy, and more.

5. Bloggers

As cloud technology usage continues to expand and evolve, blogs are a great way to stay up to speed with AWS and the world of cloud computing. Of course, in addition to aws labs, a free-trial, extensive documentation, and their own YouTube channel, AWS also has their own blog. Since AWS actually has a number of blogs that vary by region and technology, we recommend that you start by following Jeff Barr – Chief Evangelist at Amazon Web Services, and primary contributor. Edureka was mentioned in our recommended YouTube channels, they also have a blog that covers plenty of AWS topics. The CloudThat blog is an excellent resource for AWS and all things cloud, and was co-founded by Bhaves Goswami – a former member of the AWS product development team. Additionally, AWS Insider is a great source for all things AWS. Here you’ll find blogs, webcasts, how-to, tips, tricks, news articles and even more hands-on guidance for working with AWS. If you prefer newsletters straight to your inbox, check out Last Week in AWS and Inside Cloud

6. Online Learning Platforms

As public cloud computing continues to grow – and AWS continues to dominate the market – people have become increasingly interested in this CSP and what it has to offer. In the last 8-10 years, two massive learning platforms were developed, Coursera and Udemy. These platforms offer online AWS courses, specializations, training, and degrees. The abundance of courses that these platforms provide can help you learn all things AWS and give you a wide array of resources to help you train for different AWS certifications and degrees. 

7. GitHub

GitHub is a developer platform where users work together to review and host code, build software and manage projects. This platform has access to a number of materials that can help further your AWS training. In fact, here’s a great list of AWS training resources that can help you prepare for an Amazon Cloud certification. The great thing about this site is the collaboration among the users. The large number of people in this community brings together people from all different backgrounds so they are able to provide knowledge about their own specialties and experiences. With access to everything from ebooks, video courses, free lectures, and sample tests, posts like these can help you get on the right certification track. 


There’s plenty of information out there when it comes to AWS training resources. We picked our 7 favorite resources for their reliability, quality, and range of information. Whether you’re new to AWS or consider yourself an expert, these resources are sure to help you find what you’re looking for.

AWS vs Azure vs Google Cloud Market Share 2020: What the Latest Data Shows

AWS vs Azure vs Google Cloud Market Share 2020: What the Latest Data Shows

Q4 2019 earnings are in for the ‘big three’ cloud providers and you know what that means – it’s time for an AWS vs Azure vs Google Cloud market share comparison. Let’s take a look at all three providers side-by-side to see where they stand.

Note: a version of this post was originally published in April 2018 and 2019. It has been updated for 2020.

AWS vs. Azure vs. Google Cloud Earnings

To get a sense of the AWS vs Azure vs Google Cloud market share breakdown, let’s take a look at what each cloud provider’s reports shared.

AWS 

Amazon reported Amazon Web Services (AWS) revenue of $9.95 billion for Q4 2019, compared to $7.4 billion for Q4 2019. AWS revenue grew 34% in the quarter, compared to a year earlier. 

Across the business, Amazon’s quarterly sales increased to $87.4 billion, beating predictions of $86.02 billion.AWS has been a huge contributor to this growth. AWS revenue made up 11% of total Amazon sales for the quarter. AWS only continues to grow, and bolster the retail giant time after time.

One thing to keep in mind: you’ll see a couple of headlines pointing out that revenue growth is down, quoting that 34% number and comparing it to previous quarters’ growth rates, which peaked at 81% in 2015. However, that metric is of questionable value as AWS continues to increase revenue at this enormous scale, dominating the market (as we’ll see below). 

In media commentary, AWS’s numbers seem to speak for themselves:

Azure

While Amazon specifies AWS revenue, Microsoft only reports on Azure’s growth rate. That number is 62% revenue growth over the previous quarter. This time last year, growth was reported at 76%. As mentioned above, comparing growth rates to growth rates is interesting, but not necessarily as useful a metric as actual revenue numbers – which we don’t have for Azure alone.

Here are the revenue numbers Microsoft does report. Azure is under the “Intelligent Cloud” business, which grew 27% to $11.9 billion. The operating group also includes server products and cloud services (30% growth) and Enterprise Services (6% growth). 

The lack of specificity around Azure frustrates many pundits as it simply can’t be compared directly to AWS, and inevitably raises eyebrows about how Azure is really doing. Of course, it also assumes that IaaS is the only piece of “cloud” that’s important, but then, that’s how AWS has grown to dominate the market. 

A victory for the cloud provider was the October winner of the $10 billion JEDI cloud computing contract (although AWS is actively protesting the contract with claims of political interference).

Here are a few headlines on Microsoft’s reporting that caught our attention:

Google Cloud

This quarter, Google broke out revenue reporting for its cloud business for the first time. For the fourth quarter, Google Cloud generated $2.6 billion in revenue, a growth of 53% from the previous year. For 2019 as a whole, Google Cloud brought in $8.9 billion in revenue, which is less than AWS generated in the fourth quarter alone.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai stated on the earnings report conference call, “The growth rate of GCP was meaningfully higher than that of Cloud overall, and GCP’s growth rate accelerated from 2018 to 2019.”

CFO Ruth Porat also highlighted Google Cloud Anthos, as Google leans into enabling the multi-cloud reality for its customers, something AWS and Azure have avoided.

Further reading on Google’s quarterly reporting:

Cloud Computing Market Share Breakdown – AWS vs. Azure vs. Google Cloud

When we originally published this blog in 2018, we included a market share breakdown from analyst Canalys, which reported AWS in the lead owning about a third of the market, Microsoft in second with about 15 percent, and Google sitting around 5 percent.

In 2019, they reported an overall growth in the cloud infrastructure market of 42%. By provider, AWS had the biggest sales gain with a $2.3 billion YOY increase, but Canalys reported Azure and Google Cloud with bigger percentage increases.

As of February 2020, Canalys reports AWS with 32.4% of the market, Azure at 17.6%, Google Cloud at 6%, Alibaba Cloud close behind at 5.4%, and other clouds with 38.5%. 

Ultimately, it seems clear that in the case of AWS vs Azure vs Google Cloud market share – AWS still has the lead.

Bezos has said, “AWS had the unusual advantage of a seven-year head start before facing like-minded competition. As a result, the AWS services are by far the most evolved and most functionality-rich.”

Our anecdotal experience talking to cloud customers often finds that true, and it says something that Microsoft isn’t breaking down their cloud numbers just yet, while Google leans into multi-cloud.

AWS remains far in the lead for now. With that said, it will be interesting to see how the actual numbers play out, especially as Alibaba catches up.