Amazon EKS is a hosted Kubernetes solution that helps you run your container workloads in AWS without having to manage the Kubernetes control plane for your cluster. This is a great entry point for Kubernetes administrators who are looking to migrate to AWS services but want to continue using the tooling they are already familiar with. Often, users are choosing between Amazon EKS and Amazon ECS (which we recently covered, in addition to a full container services comparison), so in this article, we’ll take a look at some of the basics and features of EKS that make it a compelling option.

Amazon EKS 101

The main selling point of Amazon EKS is that the Kubernetes control plane is managed for you by AWS, so you don’t have to set up and run your own. When you set up a new cluster in EKS, you can specify if it’s going to be just available to the current VPC, or if it will be accessible to outside IP addresses. This flexibility highlights the two main deployment options for EKS:

  1. Fully within an AWS VPC, with complete integration to other AWS services you run in your account while being completely isolated from the outside world.
  2. Open and accessible, which enables hybrid-cloud, multi-cloud, or multi-account Kubernetes deployments.

Both options allow you the flexibility to use your own Kubernetes management tools, like Dashboard and kubectl, as EKS gives you the API Server Endpoint once you provision the cluster. This control plane utilizes multiple availability zones within the region you choose for redundancy.

Managed Container Showdown: EKS vs. ECS

Amazon offers two main container service options in EKS and ECS, and both are using Kubernetes under the hood. The biggest difference between the two options lies in who is doing the management of Kubernetes. With ECS, Amazon is running Kubernetes for you, and you just decide which tasks to run and when. Meanwhile, with EKS, you’re doing the Kubernetes management of your pods.

One consideration when considering EKS vs. ECS is networking and load balancing. Both services run EC2 servers behind the scenes, but the actual network connection is slightly different. ECS has network interfaces connected to individual tasks on each EC2 instance, while EKS has network interfaces connecting to multiple pods on each EC2 instance. Similarly, for load balancing, ECS can utilize Application Load Balancers to send traffic to a task, while EKS must use an Elastic Load Balancer to send traffic to an EC2 host (which can have a proxy via Kubernetes). Neither is necessarily better or worse, just a slight difference that may matter for your workload.

Sounds Great… How Much Does It Cost?

For each workload you run in Amazon EKS, there are two main charges that will apply.  First, there’s a charge of $0.20/hr (roughly $146/month) for each EKS Control Plane you run in your AWS account. Second, you’re charged for the underlying EC2 resources that are spun up by the Kubernetes controller. This second charge is very similar to how Amazon ECS charges you, and is highly dependant on the size and amount of resources you need.

Amazon EKS Best Practices

There’s no one-size-fits-all option for Kubernetes deployments, but Amazon EKS certainly has some good things going for it. If you’re already using Kubernetes, this can be a great way to seamlessly migrate to a cloud platform without changing your working processes. Also, if you’re going to be in a hybrid-cloud or multi-cloud deployment, this can make your life a little easier. That being said, for just simple Kubernetes clusters, the price of the control plane for each cluster may be too much to pay, which makes ECS a valid alternative.

More on container management and container optimization.

About Chris Parlette

Chris Parlette is the Director of Cloud Solutions at ParkMyCloud. Chris helps customers reduce their cloud waste and manage their hybrid infrastructures by drawing on his years of experience working at various software startups. From SaaS to on-prem, virtualization to cloud, monitoring tools to cloud management platforms, and small businesses to large enterprises, Chris has seen it all and loves helping drive improvements to IT management. Chris earned a BS in Computer Science from the University of Maryland. He and his wife, Megan, reside in Silver Spring, MD.

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