AWS vs Alibaba Cloud Pricing: A Comparison of Compute Options

AWS vs Alibaba Cloud Pricing: A Comparison of Compute Options

More cloud users are starting to investigate Alibaba Cloud, so the time is ripe for a comparison of AWS vs Alibaba Cloud pricing. Commonly recognized as the #4 cloud provider (from a revenue perspective anyway), Alibaba is one of the fastest growing companies in the space today.

Alibaba has been getting a lot of attention lately, given its rapid growth, and its opportunities for cloud deployments within mainland China. ParkMyCloud is preparing to release support for Alibaba, and that of course has let us focus on pricing and cost savings – our forte. In this article I am going to dive a bit into the pricing of the Alibaba Elastic Compute Service (ECS), and compare it with that of the AWS EC2 service.

Alibaba vs Aliyun

Finding actual pricing for comparison purposes can be a bit complicated, as the prices are listed in a couple different places and do not quite exactly match up. If one searches for Alibaba pricing, one ends up here, which I am going to call the “Alibaba Cloud” site. However, when you actually get an account and want to purchase an instance, you can up here or here, both of which I will call the “Aliyun” site. [Note that you may not be able to see the Aliyun sites without signing up for an account and actually logging-in.]  

Aliyun (literally translated “Ali Cloud”) was the original name of the company, and the name was changed to Alibaba Cloud in July 2017. Unsurprisingly, the Aliyun name has stuck around on the actual operational guts of the company, reflecting that it is probably hard-coded all over the place, both internally and externally with customers. (Supernor’s 3rd Conjecture: Engineering can never keep up with Marketing.)

Both sites show that like the other major cloud providers, Alibaba’s pricing model includes a Pay-As-You-Go (PAYG) offering, with per-second billing. Note, however, that in order to save money on stopped instances, one must specifically enable a “No fees for stopped instances” feature. Luckily, this is a global one-time setting for instances operating under a VPC, and you can set it and forget it. Unlike AWS, this feature is not available for any instances with local disks (this and other aspects of the description lead me to believe that Alibaba instances tend to be “sticky” to the underlying hardware instance). On AWS, local disks are described as ephemeral, and are simply deallocated when they are not in use. Like AWS, system/data disks continue to accrue costs even when an instance is stopped.

Both sites also show that Alibaba also has a one-month prepaid Subscription model. Based on a review of the pricing listed for the us-east-1 region on the Alibaba Cloud site, the monthly subscription discount reflects a substantial 30-60% discount compared to the cost of a PAYG instance that is left up for a full month. For a non-production environment that may only need to be up during normal business hours (say, 9 hours per day, weekdays only), one can easily see that it may be more cost-effective to go with the PAYG pricing, and use the ParkMyCloud service to shut the instances down during off-hours, saving 73%.

But this is where the similarities between the sites end. For actual pricing, instance availability, and even the actual instance types, one really needs to dive into a live Alibaba account. In particular, if PAYG is your preference, note that the Alibaba public site appears to have PAYG pricing listed for all of their available instance types, which is not consistent with what I found in the actual purchasing console.

Low-End Instance Types – “Entry Level” and “Basic”

The Alibaba Cloud site breaks down the instance types into “Entry Level” and “Enterprise”, listing numerous instance types under both categories. All of the Entry Level instance types are described as “Shared Performance”, which appears to mean the underlying hardware resources are shared amongst multiple instances in a potentially unpredictable way, or as described by Alibaba: “Their computing performance may be unstable, but the cost is relatively low” – an entertaining description to say the least. I did find these instance types on the internal purchasing site, but did not delve any further with them, as they do not offer a point of reference for our AWS vs. Alibaba Cloud pricing comparison. They may be an interesting path for additional investigation for non-production instance types where unstable computing performance may be OK in exchange for a lower price.

That said…after logging in to the Alibaba management console, reaching the Aliyun side of the website, there is no mention of Entry Level vs Enterprise. Instead we see the top-level options of “Basic Purchase” vs “Advanced Purchase”. Under Basic Purchase, there are four “t5” instance types. The t5 types appear to directly correspond to the first four AWS t2 instance types, in terms of building up CPU credits.

These four instance types do not appear to support the PAYG pricing model. Pricing is only offered on a monthly subscription basis. A 1-year purchase plan is also offered, but the math shows this is just the monthly price x12. It is important to note that the Aliyun site itself has issues, as it lists the t5 instance types in all of the Alibaba regions, but I was unable to purchase any of them in the us-east-1 region – “The configuration for the instance you are creating is currently not supported in this zone.”  (A purchase in us-west-1, slightly more expensive, was fine).

The following shows a price comparison for Alibaba vs AWS for “t” instance prices in a number of regions. The AWS prices reflect the hourly PAYG pricing, multiplied by an average 730 hour month. I was not able to get pricing for any AWS China region, so the Alibaba pricing is provided for reference.

While the AWS prices are higher, the AWS instances are PAYG, and thus could be stopped when not being used, common for t2 instances used in a dev-test environment, and potentially saving over 73%. One can easily see that this kind of savings is needed to compete with the comparatively low Alibaba prices. I do have to wonder what is up with that Windows pricing in China….does Microsoft know about this??

Aliyun “Advanced Purchase”

Looking at the “Advanced” side of the Aliyun purchasing site, we get a lot more options, including Pay-As-You-Go instances. To keep the comparison simple, I am going to limit the scope here to a couple of instance types, trying to compare a couple m5 and i3 instances with their Alibaba equivalents. I will list PAYG pricing where offered.

In this table, the listed monthly AWS prices reflect the hourly pay-as-you-go price, multiplied by an average 730 hour month.

The italicized/grey numbers under Alibaba indicate PAYG numbers that had to be pulled from the public-facing website, as the instance type was not available for PAYG purchase on the internal site. From a review of the various options on the internal Aliyun site, it appears the PAYG option is not actually offered for very many standalone instance types on Alibaba…

The main reason I pulled in the PAYG prices from the second source was for auto scaling, which is normally charged at PAYG prices. In Alibaba, “all ECS instances that Auto Scaling automatically creates, or manually adds, to a scaling group will be charged according to their instance types. Note that you will still be charged for Pay-As-You-Go instances even after you stop them.”  It is possible, however, to manually add subscription-based instances to an auto scaling group, and configure them to be not removed when the group scales-down.

In general, the full price of the AWS Linux instances over a month is 22-35% higher than of an Alibaba 1-month subscription. A full price AWS Windows instance over a month is 9-25%  higher than that of an Alibaba subscription. (And once again, it appears Windows licensing fees are not a factor in China.)

AWS vs Alibaba Cloud Pricing: Alibaba is cheaper, but…

Alibaba definitely comes out as less expensive in this AWS vs Alibaba cloud pricing comparison – the one-month subscription has a definite impact. However, for longer-lived instances, AWS Reserved Instances will certainly be less expensive, running about 40-75% less expensive than AWS PAYG, and thus less than some if not all of the Alibaba monthly subscriptions. AWS RI’s are also more easily applicable to auto scaling groups than a monthly subscription instance.

For non-production instances that can be shut down when not in use, PAYG is less expensive for both cloud providers, where ParkMyCloud can help you schedule the downtime. The difficulty with Alibaba will actually be finding instances types that can actually be purchased with the PAYG option.

Do Google Sustained Use Discounts Really Save You Money?

Do Google Sustained Use Discounts Really Save You Money?

When looking to keep Google Cloud Platform (GCP) costs in control, the first place users turn are the discount options offered by the cloud service provider itself, such as Google’s Sustained Use discounts. The question is: do Google Sustained Use discounts actually save you money, when you could just turn the instance off?

How Google Sustained Use discounts work

The idea of the Sustained Use discount is that the longer you run a VM instance in any given month, the bigger discount you will get from the list price. The following shows the incremental discount, and its cumulative impact on a hypothetical $100/month VM instance, where the percentages are against the baseline 730-hour month.

I have to say here that the GCP prices listed can be somewhat misleading unless you read the fine print where it says “Note: Listed monthly pricing includes applicable, automatic sustained use discounts, assuming the instance runs for a 730 hour month.”  What this means to us is that the list prices of the instances are actually much higher, but their progressive discount means that no one ever actually pays list price. That said – the list price is what you need to know in order to estimate the actual cost you will pay if you do not plan to leave the instance up for 730 hours/month.

For example, the monthly price shown on the GCP pricing link for an n1-standard-8 instance in the Iowa region is (as of this writing) $194.1800. The list price for this instance would be $194.1800/0.7 = $277.40. This is the figure that must be used as the entry point for the table above to calculate the actual cost, given a certain level of utilization.

What if you parked the VM instance instead?

Here at ParkMyCloud, we’re all about scheduling resources to turn off when you’re not using them, i.e., “parking” them. With this mindset, I wondered about the impact of the sustained use discounts on the schedule-based savings. The following chart plots the cost of that n1-standard-8 VM instance, showing Google sustained use discounts combined with a parking schedule.

In this graph, the blue and orange lines show the percent savings from the sustained use discount and scheduling, respectively, based on the number of usage hours.  The grey line shows the blended savings, and the yellow line shows the blended net cost. I am sure the sustained usage discount is described someplace with the typical hype of “the more you spend, the more you save!”  But, the reality of the matter is the more you spend…the more you spend!

Looking at what this means for ParkMyCloud users, here is the monthly uptime for a few common parking schedules, and the associated cost:

Assigned scheduleUptime per 730-hour monthActual monthly cost for notional n1-standard-8  instanceSavings compared to sustained-use cost of $194.18
7am – 7pm weekdays
(60 hours/week)
260.7 hours$93.1352%
8am – 6pm weekdays
(50 hours/week)
217.3 hours$79.9259%
8am – 5pm weekdays
(45 hours/week)
195.5 hours$73.3162%
9am – 5pm weekdays
(40 hours/week)
173.8 hours$66.0566%

Short version: while the 30% sustained use discount does seem like a great deal, any scheduled off time saves you money.  Even with the most wide-open “work day” schedule of running 12 hours per weekday, the cost/month is $93.13, a 52% savings compared to the full sustained-use cost of $194.18.  This includes the 20% sustained use discount for the usage over 182.5 hours. A welcome discount to be sure, but not a really huge impact to the bottom line.

Another way our users keep these utilization hours low is by keeping their VM instances “always parked” and temporarily overriding the schedule for a set number of hours (such as for an 8-hour workday) when their non-production resources are needed. When the duration of the override expires, the instance is automatically shut down. This gives the best possible savings, and usually never even hits the first GCP discount tier.

Do Google Sustained Use discounts save you money?

Well, it depends on how you look at it.  If you are looking at the cost one hour at a time, and you can see the discounts kick in, then it will probably feel like you are saving money.  But if you are looking at the price for a whole month (the way it shows up on your bill), then there is no net savings off the publicly listed (and already discounted) price.

To get the optimal savings on your resources, keep them running only when you’re actually using them, and park them when you’re not. If you meet the usage threshold for any of the Sustained Use Discounts then they will further lower your cost per hour. These two savings options combined will optimize your costs and provide the maximum savings.

Looking for a Google Cloud Instance Scheduling Solution? As You Wish

Looking for a Google Cloud Instance Scheduling Solution? As You Wish

Like other cloud providers, the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) charges for compute virtual machine instances by the amount of time they are running — which may lead you to search for a Google Cloud instance scheduling solution. If your GCP instances are only busy during or after normal business hours, or only at certain times of the week or month, you can save money by shutting these instances down when they are not being used. So can you set up this scheduling through the Google Cloud console? And if not – what’s the best way to do it?

Why bother scheduling a Google VM to turn off?

As mentioned, depending on your purchasing option, Google Cloud pricing is based on the amount of time an instance is running, charged at a per-second rate. We find that at least 40%, of an organization’s cloud resources (and often much more) are for non-production purposes such as development, testing, staging, and QA. These resources are only needed when employees are actively using them for those purposes — so every second that they are left running when not being used is wasted spend. Since non-production VM instances often have predictable workloads, such as a 7 AM to 7 PM work week, 5 days a week, which means the other 64% of spend is completely wasted. Inconceivable!

The good news is, that means these resources can be scheduled to turn off during nights and weekends to save money. So, let’s take a look at a couple of cloud scheduling options.

Scheduling Option 1: GCP set-scheduling Command

If you were to do a Google search on “google cloud instance scheduling,” hoping to find out how to shut your compute instances down when they are not in use, you would see numerous promising links. The first couple of references appear to discuss how to set instance availability policies and mention a gcloud command line interface for “compute instances set-scheduling”. However, a little digging shows that these interfaces and commands simply describe how to fine-tune what happens when the underlying hardware for your Google virtual machine goes down for maintenance. The options in this case are to migrate the VM to another host (which appears to be a live migration), or to terminate the VM, and if the instance should be restarted if it is terminated. The documentation for the command goes so far as to say that the command is intended to let you set “scheduling options.”  While it is great to have control over these behaviors, I feel I have to paraphrase Inigo Montoya – You keep using that word “scheduling” – I do not think it means what you think it means…

Scheduling Option 2: GCP Compute Task Scheduling

The next thing that looks schedule-like is the GCP Cron Service. This is a highly reliable networked version of the Unix cron service, letting you leverage the GCP App Engine services to do all sorts of interesting things. One article describes how to use the Cron Service and Google App Engine to schedule tasks to execute on your Compute Instances. With some App Engine code, you could use this system to start and stop instances as part of regularly recurring task sequences. This could be an excellent technique for controlling instances for scheduled builds, or calculations that happen at the same time of a day/week/month/etc.

While very useful for certain tasks, this technique really lacks flexibility. Google Cloud Cron Service schedules are configured by creating a cron.yaml file inside the app engine application. The GCP Cron Service triggers events in the application, and getting the application to do things like start/stop instances are left as an exercise for the developer. If you need to modify the schedule, you need to go back in and modify the cron.yaml. Also, it can be non-intuitive to build a schedule around your working hours, in that you would need one event for when you want to start an instance, and another when you want to stop it. If you want to set multiple instances to be on different schedules, they would each need to have their own events. This brings us to the final issue, which is that any given application is limited to 20 events for free, up to a maximum of 250 events for a paid application. Those sound like some eel-infested waters.

Scheduling Option 3: ParkMyCloud Google Cloud Instance Scheduling

Google Cloud Platform and ParkMyCloud – mawwage – that dweam within a dweam….

Given the lack of other viable instance scheduling options, we at ParkMyCloud created a SaaS app to automate instance scheduling, helping organizations cut cloud costs by 65% or more on their monthly cloud bill with AWS, Azure, and, of course, Google Cloud.

We aim to provide a number of benefits that you won’t find with, say, the GCP Cron Service. ParkMyCloud’s cloud management software:

  • Automates the process of switching non-production instances on and off with a simple, easy-to-use platform – more reliable than the manual process of switching GCP Compute instances off via the GCP console.
  • Provides a single-pane-of-glass view, allowing you to consolidate multiple clouds, multiple accounts within each cloud, and multiple regions within each account, all in one easy-to-use interface.
  • Does not require a developer background, coding, or custom scripting. It is also more flexible and cost-effective than having developers write scheduling scripts.
  • Can be used with a mobile phone or tablet.
  • Avoids the hard-coded schedules of the Cron Service. Users can temporarily override schedules if they need to use an instance on short notice.
  • Supports Teams and User Roles (with optional SSO), ensuring users will only have access to the resources you grant.
  • Helps you identify idle instances by monitoring instance performance metrics, displaying utilization heatmaps, and automatically generating utilization-based “SmartParking” schedule recommendations, which you can accept or modify as you wish...
  • Provides “rightsizing” recommendations to identify resources that are routinely underutilized and can be converted to a different Google Cloud server size to save 50-75% of the cost of the resource.
  • Has a 14-day free trial, so you can try the platform out in your own environment. There’s also a free-forever tier, useful for startups and those on the Google Cloud free tier, as well as paid tiers with more advanced options for enterprises with a larger Google Cloud footprint.

How Much Can You Save with Scheduling?

While it depends on your exact schedule, many non-production Google Cloud VMs – those used for development, testing, staging, and QA – can be turned off for 12 hours/day on weekdays, and 24 hours/day on weekends. For example, the resource might be running from 7 AM to 7 PM Monday through Friday, and “parked” the rest of the week. This comes out to about 64% savings per resource.

Currently, the average savings per scheduled VM in the ParkMyCloud platform is about $200/month.

How Enterprises Are Benefitting from ParkMyCloud’s Scheduling Software

If you’re not quite ready to start your own trial, take a look at this use case from Workfront, a work management software provider. Workfront uses both AWS and Google Cloud Compute Engine, and needed to coordinate cloud management software across both public clouds. They required automation in order to optimize and control cloud resource costs, especially given users’ tendency to leave resources running when they weren’t being used.

Workfront found that ParkMyCloud would meet their automatic scheduling needs. Now, 200 users throughout the company use ParkMyCloud to:

  • Get recommendations of resources that are not being used 24×7, and use policies to automatically apply on/off schedules to them
  • Get notifications and control the state of their resources through Slack
  • Easily report savings to management
  • Save over $200,000 per year

Ways to Save on Google Cloud VMs, Beyond Scheduling

Google has done a great job of creating offerings for customers to save money through regular cloud usage. The two you’ll see mentioned the most are sustained use discounts and committed use discounts. Sustained use discounts give Google Cloud users automatic discounts the longer an instance is run. This post outlines the break-even points between letting an instance run for the discount vs. parking it. Committed use discounts, on the other hand, require an upfront commitment for 1 or 3 years’ usage. We have found that they’re best applicable for predictable workloads such as production environments. There are also the pre-emptible VMs, which are offered at a discount from on demand VMs in exchange for being short-lived – up to 24 hours.

How to Create a Google Cloud Schedule with ParkMyCloud 

Getting started with ParkMyCloud is easy. Simply register for a free trial with your email address and connect to your Google Cloud Platform to allow ParkMyCloud to discover and manage your resources. A 14-day free trial free gives your organization the opportunity to evaluate the benefits of ParkMyCloud while you only pay for the cloud computing power you use. At the end of the trial, there is no obligation on you to continue with our service, and all the money your organization has saved is, of course, yours to keep.

Have fun storming the castle!

Azure Region Pricing: Costs for Compute

Azure Region Pricing: Costs for Compute

In this blog we are going to examine how Microsoft Azure region pricing varies and how region selection can help you reduce cloud spending.

How Organizations Select Public Cloud Regions

There are many comparisons that go into pricing differences between AWS vs Azure vs GCP, etc. At the end of the day, however, most organizations select one primary cloud service provider (CSP) for most of their workloads, plus maybe another for multi-cloud redundancy of critical services. Once selected, organizations then typically put many of their workloads in the region closest to their offices, plus maybe some geographic redundancy in their production systems. In other situations, a certain region is selected because that is the first region to support some new CSP feature. As time goes by, other regions become options because either those new features are propagated through the system, or whole new regions are created.

CSP regions tend to cluster around certain larger geographic regions, that I will call “areas” for the purpose of this blog. Looking at Azure in particular, we can see that Azure has three major US areas (Western, Central, and Eastern). The Western and Eastern US areas each have two Azure regions, and the Central area has four Azure regions. The UK, Europe and Australia areas each have two Azure regions. There are a number of other Azure regions as well, but they are far enough dispersed that I would consider them to be areas with a single region.

How Does Azure Region Pricing Vary?

With this regional distribution as a starting point, let’s look next at costs for instances. Here is a somewhat random selection of Azure region pricing data, looking at a variety of instance types (cost data as of approximately March 1, 2018).

While this graphic is a bit busy, there are a couple things that jump out at us:

  • Within most of the areas, there are clearly more expensive regions and less expensive regions.
  • The least expensive regions, on average across these instance types are us-west-2, us-west-central, and korea-south.
  • The most expensive regions are asia-pacific-east, japan-east, and australia-east.
  • Windows instances are about 1.5-3 times more expensive than their Linux-based counterparts

Let’s zoom-in on Azure Standard_DS2_v2 instance type, which comprises almost 60% of the total population of Azure instances customers are managing in the ParkMyCloud platform.

We can clearly see the relative volatility in the cost of this instance type across regions. And, while the Windows instance is about 1.5-2 times the cost of the Linux instance, the volatility is fairly closely mirrored across the regions.

Of more interest, however, is how the costs can differ within a given area. From that comparison we can see that there is some real savings to be gained by careful region selection within an area:

Over the course of a year, strategic region selection of a Windows DS2 instance could save up to $578 for the asia-pacific regions, $298 for the us-east regions, and $228 for the Korean regions.  

How to Save Using Regions

By comparing regions within your desired “area” as illustrated above, the savings over a quantity of instances can be significant. Good region selection is fundamental to controlling Azure costs, and for costs across the other clouds as well.

The M Instance type: EC2 starts here

The M Instance type: EC2 starts here

If you are using AWS EC2 in production, chances are good that you’re using the AWS M instance type. The M family is a “General Purpose” instance type in AWS, most closely matching a typical off-the-shelf server one would buy from Dell, HP, etc, and was the first instance family released by AWS in 2006.

If you are looking for mnemonics for an AWS certification exam, you may want to think of the M instance type as the Main choice, or the happy Medium between the more specialized instances. The M instance provides a good balance of CPU, RAM, and disk size/performance. The other instance types specialize in different ways, providing above average CPU, RAM, or disk size/performance, and include a price premium. The one exception is the “T” instance type, discussed further below.

For a normal web or application server workload, the M instance type is probably the best tool for the job. Unless you KNOW you are going to be running a highly RAM/CPU/IO-intensive workload, you can usually start with an M instance, monitor its performance for a while, and then if the instance is performance-limited by one of the hardware characteristics, switch over to a more specialized instance to remove the constraint. For example:

  • “C” instances for Compute/CPU performance.
  • “R” or “X” instances for lots of memory – RAM or eXtreme RAM
  • “D”, “H”, or “I” instances optimize for storage with different types/quantities of local storage drives (i.e., HDD or SDD that are part of the physical hardware the instance is running on) for high-Density storage (up to 48TB), High sequential throughput, or fast random I/O IOPS, respectively. (The latter two categories are much more specialized – see here for more details)

The “T” instance family is much like the “M” family, in that it is aimed at general purpose workloads, but at a lower price point. The key difference (and perhaps the only difference) is that the CPU performance is restricted to bursts of high performance (or “bursTs”) that are tracked by AWS through a system of CPU credits. Credits build up when the system is idle, and are consumed when the CPU load exceeds a certain baseline. When the CPU credit balance is used up, the CPU is Throttled to a fraction of its full speed. T instances are good for low-load web servers and non-production systems, such as those used by developers or testers, where continuous predictable high performance is not needed.

Statistics

Looking at some statistics, the Botmetric Public Cloud Usage Report for 2017 states that 46% of AWS EC2 usage is on the M family, and 83% of non-production workloads are on T instances. Within the ParkMyCloud environment, we see the following top instance family statistics across our customers’ environments:

  • I instances: 39%
  • M instances: 22%
  • T instances: 27%

Since many of our customers are focused on cost optimization for non-production cloud resources (i.e., a lot of developers and test environments), we are probably seeing more “T” instances than “M” instances as they are less expensive, and the “bursty” nature of T instances is not a factor in their work. For a production workload, M instances with dedicated CPU resources are more predictable. While we cannot say for sure why we are also seeing a very large number of “I” instances, it is quite possible that developers/testers are running database software in an EC2 instance, rather than in RDS, in order to have more direct control and visibility into the database system. Still, 49% of the resources are in the General Purpose M and T families.

The Nitty and/or Gritty

Assuming you have decided that an M instance is the right tool for your job, your next choice will be to decide which one. As of the date of this blog, there are twelve different instance types within the M family, covering two generations of systems.

Table 1 – The M Instance Family Specs (Pricing per hour for on-demand instances in US-East-1 Region)

The M4 generation was released in June 2015. The M4 runs 64-bit operating systems on hardware with the 2.3 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2686 (Broadwell) or 2.4 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2676 H3 (Haswell) processors, potentially jumping to 3GHz with Turbo Boost. None of the M4 instance family supports instance store disks, but are all EBS-optimized by default. These instances also support Enhanced Networking, a no-extra-cost option that allows up to 10 Gbps of network bandwidth.

The M5 generation was just released this past November at re:Invent 2017. The M5 generation is based on custom Intel Xeon Platinum 8175M processors running at 2.5GHz. When communicating with other systems in a Cluster Placement Group (a grouping of instances in a single Availability Zone), the m5.24xlarge instance can support an amazing 25 Gbps of network bandwidth. The M5 type also support EBS via an NVMe driver, a block storage interface designed for flash memory. Interestingly, AWS has not jacked-up the EBS performance guarantee for this faster EBS interface. This may be because it is the customer’s responsibility to install the right driver to get the higher performance on older OS images, so this could also be a cheap/free performance win if you can migrate to M5.

Amazon states that the M5 generation delivers 14% better price/performance on a per-core basis than the M4 generation. In the pricing above, one can do the math and find that all of the M5 instances cost $0.048 per vCPU per hour, and that the M4 instances all cost $0.05 per vCPU per hour. So right out of the box, the M5 is priced 4% cheaper than an equivalently configured M4. Do the same math for RAM vs vCPU and you can see that AWS allocates 4GB of RAM per vCPU in both the M4 and M5 generations. This probably says a lot about how the underlying hardware is sliced/diced for virtual machines in the AWS data centers.

For more thoughts on historic M instance pricing, please see our other blog about the dropping cost of cloud services.

Parting thoughts

Some key takeaways:

  • If you are not sure how your application is going to behave under a production load, start with an M instance and migrate to something more specialized if needed.
  • If you do not need consistent and continuous high CPU performance, like for dev/test or low usage systems, consider using the similarly General Purpose T instance family.
  • If you are launching a new instance, use the M5 generation for the better value.

Overall, the M family gives the best price/performance for General Purpose production systems,  Making it your Main choice for Middlin’ performance of Most workloads!