Interview: Cyber Security Orchestration Vendor Syncurity Optimizes Cloud Costs with ParkMyCloud

Interview: Cyber Security Orchestration Vendor Syncurity Optimizes Cloud Costs with ParkMyCloud

We chatted with JP Bourget, founder and CSO of Syncurity, about how his cybersecurity orchestration company uses ParkMyCloud. 

Hi JP. Can you start off by telling us about Syncurity, what you do, and how big your team is? 

Sure. We’re a cybersecurity orchestration vendor. We are in the cybersecurity product space of SOAR which is security, orchestration, automation, and response. What we do is we facilitate the security alert handling, sometimes called triage, and then use automation to help decide if the alert is concerning, and if necessary kick off a response process for the security operations center or incident response team. We usually launch these processes with alert polling as well as run our automated analysis/enrichment with alert ingesting via security product APIs. 

I’m the founder and CSO. There’s about 25 of us on the team.

What clouds do you use, and how are you using those clouds?

We use Amazon, Azure, Google, Oracle, and Digital Ocean. We do a lot of CI using CircleCI, Travis, and some others.

The reason that we use all those clouds is because we ship images on the different cloud providers for consumption by customers. Our product is subscription-based and we share a private image with our customers, they can then go deploy our product in their environment.

Most of our work is done on Azure VMs and Amazon EC2. We also have another cloud environment which is hosted on bare metal servers that we use for VMware – I don’t get billed per VMguest in that scenario. It’s a per bare metal server cost model. We also now use spot instances quite often based on ParkMyCloud helping us understand the benefit of them, even for longer running instances. 

As for how we’re using them, most of our QA and Proof of Concepts are done in Amazon. Because we do all this automation, we have a huge integration lab up in Amazon. We also do POCs in all the other vendors based on customer requirements.

How did you decide to start using ParkMyCloud? 

We’ve been using ParkMyCloud right from the beginning – we know the team that helped build the product. 

The key benefit of ParkMyCloud for me is that I have about 75 instances at any one time that don’t need to be running all the time because it’s the lab. In some cases, I need to turn on a lab in a fashion that gives me a stack of tools, or I need to run a lab in a fashion where the machines run a schedule. 

There’s certain stuff that is dummy infrastructure or lab infrastructure like windows servers and domains that we want running most of the time, but we turn them off on the weekend. But there are other things that only ever need to be turned on when we’re using them. So what ParkMyCloud gives me is the ability to essentially have an interface that’s multi-cloud for anybody to go in and turn a box on as needed and then automatically turn them off.

How would you describe your experience using ParkMyCloud?

I like being able to see my projected savings right on the platform. The other thing that I really like is the fact that I can see how much a box costs a month instead of hourly. It’s one of those small things that provides huge value. Amazon provides that hourly information but you have to calculate the monthly cost.

We use ParkMyCloud as an alternative to some users logging directly into the AWS console, which is a lot easier. 

How much have you saved using ParkMyCloud?

Our total savings to date is more than $70,000.

Great to hear – thanks JP! 

 

More interviews with ParkMyCloud users:

If you use AWS RIs, you need to use the new queuing option

If you use AWS RIs, you need to use the new queuing option

The AWS reserved instance (AWS RI) offerings got a recent upgrade with the release of a “queue” function. This means that you can now purchase reserved instances that, rather than going into effect immediately, are scheduled for future purchase. (Yes – despite the fact that RI’s have been available for a decade, this is a new feature!)

Back up – what was released? 

If you haven’t used AWS RIs before, it’s worth a brief primer. When you purchase a reservation, you’re not buying a specific instance or even capacity: it’s a billing function. In exchange for a commitment over 1 or 3 years, you get an attractive discount. These discounts are applied on the back end of the billing process, and are allocated against specific instances on an hour-by-hour basis over the course of the month. 

There are a few variations within the AWS RI purchasing options, such as the term; how much you pay upfront vs. monthly; the option for them to be scheduled; whether the scope of the discount covers instances in a single region or in a particular availability zone; etc.

More on those options and whether you should actually be using Reserved Instances, in this post. (TL;DR: RIs are the right choice when you have 24×7 long-term production workloads; otherwise they’re usually not.) 

So, the new feature is the option to purchase these reservation discounts to begin on a future date rather than immediately. This is designed to make it easier for users to have uninterrupted reserved instance coverage. Previously, at the end of a 1- or 3-year term, many users would be unaware that their reservation expired and would have a spike in cost…which they may or may not notice. 

How does queuing work?

Now, when planned correctly, you can avoid the lapse of Reserved Instance coverage for your workloads by scheduling a new reservation purchase to go into effect as soon as the previous one expires. The furthest in advance you can schedule a purchase is three years, which is also the longest RI term available. 

Before queueing was available, customers had the option to either just go ahead and purchase a new reservation a few days/hours/weeks before the previous RI was due to expire, or set a reminder to go in and buy a new reservation after the previous one had lapsed. Either way, there was an extra cost – either a time window with too many RIs, or one with too few. So it is easy to see that RI queueing can save you money. Queueing can also save you some hassle, as you no longer have to set reminders and build your daily/weekly schedule around going in to buy a new RI. (Reminiscent of some late-night eBay sessions, waiting for the end of an auction to roll around.)

There are a few limitations. AWS RI purchases can be queued for regional Reserved Instances, but not zonal Reserved Instances. Regional RIs are the broader option as they cover any availability zone in a region, while zonal RIs are for a specific availability zone and actually reserve capacity as well. 

Cancellation is an option: since payment is processed only at the scheduled purchase time in the queue, you can cancel a purchase at any time before it is processed. 

We find it interesting that these are designed as new purchases rather than a “renewable” RIs – likely due to an idea that users may queue an evolving RI type or purchase profile, instead of the same instance type/duration/payment terms over time.

Beware the AWS RI Black Hole

Of course, the downside to queuing a purchase in advance is that you now have a new commitment to track – and one that may not meet your needs by the time the purchase goes into effect. 

It’s already difficult to shine light on your existing reservations, especially with options in place such as instance size flexibility and the broad applicability of regional RIs.

That’s why ParkMyCloud has released our first support for Reserved Instances this week. You told us that RIs are the next biggest thing that need optimization help on your cloud bills, and we listened. Now, you can see all your AWS RIs – past, present, and queued future purchases – in one place in ParkMyCloud. Next, we’ll be working on more recommendations and optimization – stay tuned!

How to Get the Cheapest Cloud Computing

How to Get the Cheapest Cloud Computing

Are you looking for the cheapest cloud computing available? Depending on your current situation, there are a few ways you might find the least expensive cloud offering that fits your needs.

If you don’t currently use the public cloud, or if you’re willing to have infrastructure in multiple clouds, you’re probably looking for the cheapest cloud provider. If you have existing infrastructure, there are a few approaches you can take to minimize costs and ensure they don’t spiral out of control.

Find the Cloud Provider that Offers the Cheapest Cloud Computing for Your Needs

There are a variety of small cloud providers that attempt to compete by dropping their prices. If you work for a small business and prefer a no-frills experience, perhaps one of these is right for you.

However, there’s a reason that the “big three” cloud providers – Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud dominate the market. They offer a wide range of product lines, and are continually innovating. They have a low frequency of outages, and their scale requires a straightforward onboarding process and plenty of documentation. 

Whatever provider you decide on, ensure that you’ll have access to all the services you need – is there a computing product, storage, databases? If you want to use containers or have the option for serverless, how do those products fit in? How good is the customer support? Does your company directly compete with the provider – for example, with Amazon’s retail arm? (You may not care, but some companies definitely do.) 

While there is no one “cheapest” cloud provider among the major options, you should still compare to ensure you’re getting the best cloud prices for the services you’ll use most. For more information about the three major providers’ pricing, please see the following cloud computing cost comparisons:

A note on the idea of vendor lock-in: if you are already purchasing cloud services from a cloud service provider, you may be worried that you’re “locked in” to that provider. What we see in practice is a little different: with on-demand flexibility and more opportunity than ever to practice multi-cloud, companies shouldn’t really worry about vendor lock-in when it comes to public cloud.

How to Get the Cheapest Cloud Computing from Your Current Provider

Of course, whether or not you’re concerned about vendor lock-in, you should ensure that you’re getting the most efficient cloud computing cost available to you. That means optimizing your options for the products you use most. 

Here’s a brief rundown of things you should do to ensure you’re getting the cheapest cloud computing possible from your current provider.

Use Reserved Instances for Production Environments

All of the major cloud providers offer a pricing option for Reserved Instances – that is, if you commit to use capacity over time, you can pay a discounted price.  Reserved instances can save money – as long as you use them the right way. It’s important to focus on workloads with 24×7 demand – i.e., production workloads – for Reserved Instances. You will get the best price for the longest commitment. Of course, each cloud provider structures this option differently. Here are our guides to each:

Only Pay for What You Actually Need

There are a few common ways that users inadvertently waste money and throw away the option for the cheapest public cloud bill, such as using larger instances than they need, and running development/testing instances 24/7 rather than only when they’re needed. To pay for what you need, ensure that all of your instances are “rightsized” to the size that best matches the workload. You should also use on/off schedules so your non-production resources used for development, testing, and staging are turned off nights and weekends. 

ParkMyCloud makes it easy to automated both of those things and reduce wasted cloud spend – try it out.

Take Advantage of Other Discounted Pricing Options

There are a number of other discounted pricing and purchasing options offered by the major cloud providers to help you get the cheapest cloud services. 

  • AWS Spot Instances – the best way to get the cheapest EC2 instance. This option offers heavy discounts for excess infrastructure, which can be reclaimed for other workloads at any time.
  • Azure Low Priority VMs – similar to AWS’s spot instances, although there is a fixed discount for Azure’s offering, and a few other operational differences.
  • Google Cloud Preemptible VMs – Google Cloud’s preemptible VMs are another similar option.
  • Google Cloud Sustained Use Discounts – this is a built-in pricing mechanism for Google users that discounts pricing the more you run each server.
  • Azure Dev/Test Pricing – a discounting option specifically for workloads used for development and testing. 

Ask

It never hurts to contact your provider and ask if there’s anything you could be doing to get a cheaper price. If you use Microsoft Azure, you may want to sign up for an Enterprise License Agreement, or if you’re on AWS, ask your rep about the Enterprise Discount Program. Or maybe you qualify for AWS startup credits

Get Credit for Your Efforts

While finding the cheapest cloud computing is, of course, beneficial to your organization’s common good, there’s no need to let your work in spending reduction go unnoticed. Make sure that you track your organization’s spending and show your team where you are reducing spend.

ParkMyCloud users have a straightforward way to do this. You can not only create and customize reports of your cloud spending and savings, but you can also schedule these reports to be emailed out. Users are already putting this to work by having savings reports automatically emailed to their bosses and department heads, to ensure that leadership is aware of the cost savings gained… and so users can get credit for their efforts.

10 Things You Should Know Before Buying Azure Reserved Instances

10 Things You Should Know Before Buying Azure Reserved Instances

Azure Reserved Instances are a way to reduce Azure costs by committing to a one- or three-year term for a virtual machine, in exchange for a discount of up to 72% compared to pay-as-you-go. Of course, before you lock in such a commitment, there are a few things you should know about this purchasing option – here are 10.

1. Azure Reserved Instances are a purchasing option.

First, you should understand that what you’re “reserving” is the pricing and purchasing option – the virtual machines are the same that you can pay for through pay-as-you-go pricing.  (If this seems counterintuitive to the idea of “that virtual machine I reserved,” recall that a reservation works more like a credit against your bill in retrospect rather than a specific VM with your name on it.)

2. Reservations are “use it or lose it”. 

Important: reservation discounts are “use it or lose it”. If no resources match your reservation for any hour, you lose the reservation for that hour. This is why you should always ensure that you have predictable, full-time usage planned before reserving capacity. 

3. They’re not available for everything… but perhaps more than you’d guess.

Reservations are available for virtual machines, SQL database compute capacity, Azure Cosmos DB throughput. 

Keep in mind what services are covered by your reservation:

  • Reserved Virtual Machine Instance – the reservation covers compute costs, but not software, networking, or storage costs.
  • Azure Cosmos DB reserved capacity – reservations are for the provisioned throughput – not storage or networking charges. 
  • SQL Database reserved vCore – the reservation covers the compute costs, but not licenses.
  • SQL Data Warehouse – reservations cover “compute Data Warehouse Units” (cDWU), or units of CPU, memory, and IO – but not storage or networking charges.
  • App Service stamp fee – reservations cover stamp usage, but not workers and therefore other resources associated with the stamp.

There are some limitations to availability. You cannot purchase reservations for A-series, Av2-series, or G-series VMs; any VM-series or size in preview; Germany or China regions; or in some cases, reservations may be limited due to low capacity in a region.

4. You need to set a “scope” for the Reserved Instance to apply.

Another concept to be familiar with is the concept of “scope” for reservations – in other words, what subscription or resource groups are eligible for the discount you are purchasing. Scope can be limited to a single resource group, a single subscription, or shared scope across multiple eligible subscriptions as long as billing is tied together.

5. Instance sizes are flexible, automatically.

When you purchase Azure Reserved Instances, there is an option to “optimize for instance size flexibility” that will be selected by default. This means the reservation can apply to the VM sizes in the same VM group, which makes each reservation a bit more broadly applicable.

6. Whether you pay upfront or monthly, the cost is the same.

Payment options: Azure just released in September 2019 the ability to pay for reservations through monthly payments – at the same cost that you would pay up front, with no extra fees. There is no “partial upfront” option. This is in contrast to, say, AWS’s Reserved Instance options, which have a variable discount depending on how much you pay upfront. The difference in approach may vary due to the cancellation options – AWS users can resell unused capacity on the Reserved Instance marketplace, while Azure users pay a cancellation fee. Google Cloud offers only a billed-monthly option – with no option to cancel.  

7. Azure recommends Reserved Instances based on your usage history.

Reservation Recommendations and quantity are shown when you purchase a VM reserved instance in the Azure portal, based on the last 30 days of usage and your savings potential.  You can see recommendations in Azure Advisor, at least, for individual subscriptions. For shared scope, you can use the API to get purchase recommendations. 

8. Azure Reserved Instance purchases are used immediately, and don’t renew.

There are two important things to understand regarding terms and renewal. First, the term for your reservation starts immediately: you can’t schedule them for a future date. Second, Azure Reserved Instances do not automatically renew, and when the billing term expires, you’ll pay the pay-as-you-go rate. (We’ll be blogging next week on an option AWS has recently released to queue new reservations in advance.) 

9. There are two solid options if you no longer need a reservation you already purchased.

What happens if you determine that you no longer need an Azure Reserved Instance you’ve purchased? There are two main options:

Exchange – you can exchange a reservation for another of the same type– that is, you can’t return a VM reservation to purchase an SQL reservation. This is only allowed if the total lifetime cost of the new purchase is greater than the leftover payments that are canceled for the returned reservation. 

Cancel – instead, you can choose to cancel the reservation contract and request a refund. However, you are subject to an early termination fee of 12%. Note also that there’s a total refund limit of $50,000 in a rolling 12-month window. 

10. Azure Reserved Instances make sense… in some situations.

For predictable production workloads, where you know you’ll have VMs running 24×7, Azure Reserved Instances can make sense. However, for your non-production workloads, this is likely not the case. You’ll save far more by using pay-as-you-go pricing, and scheduling those VMs to turn off when they’re not needed (ParkMyCloud can help with that.) 

Further reading:

How much do the differences between cloud providers actually matter?

How to save money with Microsoft Azure Enterprise Agreements

Can Azure Dev/Test pricing save you money?

3 Things to Look Forward to at Microsoft Ignite 2019

3 Things to Look Forward to at Microsoft Ignite 2019

The ParkMyCloud team is looking forward to attending our first Microsoft Ignite conference this year! The sold-out event, which will take place November 4-8 in Orlando, is a gathering of more than 25,000 Microsoft users focused on building solutions and managing infrastructures. Here are three things to look forward to at the conference. 

1. Announcements

As with other tech conferences, Microsoft will make plenty of product and service announcements at Ignite 2019. At the 2018 conference, more than 150 announcements covered product and roadmap highlights across AI/Machine Learning, Analytics, Blockchain, Compute, Containers, Databases, Developer Tools, DevOps, Identity, Integration, IoT, Management and Governance, Microsoft Azure Stack, Migration, Mobile, Networking, Security, Storage, Web, and Windows Virtual Desktop. 

Highlights from last year include doing away with passwords using Microsoft Azure Active Directory, Surface Hub 2 whiteboards, Microsoft Teams updates, Azure Digital Twins, and more – so we’re sure 2019 will have some exciting releases in store. 

2. Speakers & Sessions

Featured speakers at the event include leaders from throughout Microsoft – but it doesn’t stop there. There are currently 1445 sessions on the calendar – more than 500 of which are on Azure. Typically when confronted with this volume of options, we recommend that you pick 1-2 goals of things you would like to learn or questions you would like to get answered for your business, and look for relevant sessions from there. Many sessions will be recorded and posted online, so keep that in mind if you are interested in sessions at conflicting times – you can always come back to them. 

That said, here are a few sessions we thought looked particularly interesting:

  • THR1004 –  A real-world smart city: How Richmond VA is transforming citizen services
  • WRK 3017 – Accelerating natural language processing development with Azure Machine Learning
  • UNC1010 – Achieving zero downtime deployments with Azure DevOps and Kubernetes
  • BRK3181 – Advanced monitoring: Five Azure Monitor best practices you should know
  • BRK3190 – Analyze, manage, and optimize your cloud cost with Azure Cost Management
  • BRK1074 – Announcing Bing Maps Geospatial Analytics Platform Preview for Enterprise Business Planning
  • BRK3062 – API management for microservices in a hybrid and multi-cloud world
  • BRK2021 – Architecting and implementing governance across your Azure subscriptions
  • THR2186 – Azure Databricks and Azure Machine Learning better together

Check out also the 140 (!) podcasts that will broadcast live during the event.

3. Fun

Of course, part of the conference experience is the fun surrounding all the sessions. Be sure to spend some time in the expo hall to meet vendors, see product demos, get swag, and enter drawings for the chance to win cool prizes.

Don’t miss Thursday evening after party – this year, it’s at Universal Studios Florida and Universal’s Island of Adventure, which means you can explore Hogsmeade and more with access to the parks and rides, food and drink, and more. 

See You at Microsoft Ignite 2019

We hope to see you at the event! We’ll be joining our parent company Turbonomic at booth #1713 in the expo hall. Schedule a time to stop by – we’d love to chat cost optimization for Azure and hear what you think of the event.