AWS CPU credits are unique to T-series instances – and they can be a bit tricky to figure out. Whether you’re using the AWS free tier or just trying to use the smallest EC2 compute instance you can, you’ll need to keep track of these credits. These credits are both generated and used by the T2 and T3 instance families to decide how much CPU power you can actually use on those EC2 instances. This can be confusing if you aren’t expecting your virtual machine to have it’s CPU power throttled, or are wondering why the cost is much higher than you thought it would be.

T-series History

AWS first released a “burstable” instance type in the form of the t1.micro instance size in 2010, which was four years after the first EC2 instance size was released (m1.small in 2006, for you historians). Up until 2010, new instance sizes had always been bigger than the m1.small size, but there was demand for a VM size that could accommodate low-throughput or inconsistent workloads.

The t1.micro was the only burstable instance size for another four years, until the t2.medium was released in 2014. Soon, there was a whole range of t2 instances to cover the use case of servers that were low-powered while idle, but could have lots of potential compute resources available for the couple minutes each hour they were needed. In 2018, AWS introduced the t3 family that uses more modern CPUs and the AWS Nitro system for virtualization.

AWS CPU Credits 101

The key reason why T-series instances have a lower list price than corresponding M-series instances (in standard mode, more on that later) is the CPU credits that are tracked and used on each resource. The basic premise is that an idle instance earns credits, while a busy instance spends those credits. A “credit” corresponds to 1 minute’s worth of full 100% CPU usage, but this can be broken down in different ways if the usage is less than 100%.  For instance, 10% of CPU usage for 10 minutes also uses 1 credit. Each T-series machine size not only has a number of CPUs available, but also earns credits at different rates.

Here’s where the math starts getting a little tricky. A t2.micro instance earns 6 credits per hour with 1 available CPU. If you run that instance at 10% utilization for a full hour, it’ll spend 6 credits per hour (or 1 credit every 10 minutes). This means that any time spent under 10% utilization is a net increase in CPU credits, while any time spent above 10% utilization is a net decrease in CPU credits. A t3.large instance has 2 CPUs and earns 36 credits per hour, which means the balancing point where the net credit use is zero will be at 30% utilization per CPU.

So what happens when you run out of credits or never use your credits?

Standard Mode vs. Unlimited Mode

One of the differences between the t2 family and the t3 family is the default way each handles running out of credits. The t2 family defaults to Standard Mode, which means that once the instance has run out of credits to use, the CPU is throttled to the baseline value we calculated above (so 10% for t2.micro) and will continue maxing out at that value until credits have built back up. In practice, this means that your process or application that has burst up to use a lot more CPU than normal will soon be slow and unusable if the load remains high.

In 2017, AWS introduced Unlimited Mode as an option for t2 instances – and later, in 2018, as the default for t3 instances when they were introduced. Unlimited mode means that instead of throttling down to the baseline CPU when your instance runs out of credits, you can continue to run at a high CPU load and just pay for the overages. This price is 5¢ per CPU hour for Linux and 9.6¢ per CPU hour for Windows. In practice, this means that a t2.micro that has run out of credits and is running at 35% CPU utilization for a full 24 hours would cost an additional 30¢ that day on top of the normal 27.84¢ for 24hr usage, meaning the price is more than doubled.

Using T-series Instead of M-series

These overage charges for Unlimited Mode of t2 and t3 instances means that while the list price of the instance is much cheaper than corresponding m4 and m5 instances, you need to figure out if the utilization pattern of your workload makes sense for a burstable instance family. For example, an m5.large in us-east-1 costs 9.6¢/hr and a t3.large with similar specs costs 8.32¢/hr with a 30% CPU baseline. If your t3.large server is going to be running higher than 55.6% CPU for the hour on a consistent basis, then the price of the m5.large is actually lower.

When to Stop T-series and When to Let Them Run

One perk of using the t2 instances in Standard mode is that each time you start the server, you receive 30 launch credits that allow a high level of CPU usage when you first start the instance from a stopped state. These launch credits are tracked separately from accrued credits and are used first, so servers that only need to run short-lived processes when first starting can take advantage of this fact. The downside of stopping t2 servers is that accrued credits are lost when you stop the instance.

On the other hand, t3 servers persist earned credits for 7 days after stopping the instance, but don’t earn launch credits when they are first started. This is useful to know for longer-running processes that don’t have huge spikes, as they can build up credits but you don’t need to worry about losing the credits if you stop the server. 

At ParkMyCloud, we specialize in scheduling servers and databases to turn off on a schedule, which is perfect for non-production servers. We find that lots of users have t2 and t3 instances for these dev and test workloads, but want to know what happens to credits if you park those servers overnight. As we discussed, AWS CPU credits go away in T2 standard mode (but with additional launch credits) but persist in T3 Unlimited mode. Knowing this, you can pick the right instance size for the workload you’re running and confidently save money using ParkMyCloud. 

  • Best for non-production instances that have a quick burst of usage when starting = T2 instance with ParkMyCloud parking schedule
  • Best for non-production instances with unpredictable, but sporadic spikes = T3 instance with ParkMyCloud parking schedule

Try it for free to see how we can make the cost of your t2 and t3 servers even lower.

Further reading on saving money on AWS: 

 

 

 

About Chris Parlette

Chris Parlette is the Director of Cloud Solutions at ParkMyCloud. Chris helps customers reduce their cloud waste and manage their hybrid infrastructures by drawing on his years of experience working at various software startups. From SaaS to on-prem, virtualization to cloud, monitoring tools to cloud management platforms, and small businesses to large enterprises, Chris has seen it all and loves helping drive improvements to IT management. Chris earned a BS in Computer Science from the University of Maryland. He and his wife, Megan, reside in Silver Spring, MD.