Don’t Let Your Server Patching Schedule Get in the Way of Cost Control

Don’t Let Your Server Patching Schedule Get in the Way of Cost Control

Don’t let your server patching schedule get in the way of saving money. The idea of minimizing cloud waste was a very new concept two years ago, but as cloud use has grown, so has the need for minimizing wasted spend. CFOs now demand that the cloud operations teams turn off idle systems in the face of rising cloud bills, but the users of these systems are the ones that have to deal with servers being off when they need them.

Users of ParkMyCloud are able to overcome some of the common objections to scheduling non-production resources. The most common objection is, “What if I need the server or database when it’s scheduled to be off?” That’s why ParkMyCloud offers the ability to “snooze” the schedule, which is a temporary override that lets you choose how long you need the system for. This snooze can be done easily from our UI, or through alternative methods like our API, mobile app, or Slackbot.

A related objection is related to how your parking schedule can work with your server patching schedule. The most common way of dealing with patching in ParkMyCloud is to use our API. The workflow would be to log in through the API, get a list of the resources, then choose which resources you want and choose to “snooze” the schedule for a couple of hours, or however long the patching takes. Once the schedule is snoozed, you can toggle the instance on, then do the patching. After the patching is complete, you can either cancel the snooze to go back to the original schedule or wait for the snooze to finish and timeout. If you have an automated patching tool that can make REST calls, this can be an easy way to patch on demand with minimal work.

If you’re on a weekly server patching schedule, you could also just implement the patch times into your pre-set schedules so that the instances turn on, say, at 2:00 a.m. on Wednesdays. By plugging this into your normal schedules, you can still save money during most off-hours, but have the instances on when the patch window is open. This can be a great way to do weekly backups as well, with minimal disruption.

This use of ParkMyCloud while plugging in to external tools and processes is the best way to get every developer and CloudOps engineer on board with continuous cost control. By reducing these objections, you can reduce your cloud costs and be the hero of your organization. Start up a free trial today to see these plug-ins in action!

7 Ways Cloud Services Pricing is Confusing

7 Ways Cloud Services Pricing is Confusing

Beware the sticker shock – cloud services pricing is nothing close to simple, especially as you come to terms with the dollar amount on your monthly cloud bill. While cloud service providers like AWS, Azure, and Google were meant to provide compute resources to save enterprises money on their infrastructure, cloud services pricing is complicated, messy, and difficult to understand. Here are 7 ways that cloud providers obscure pricing on your monthly bill:  

1 – They use varying terminology

For the purpose of this post, we’ll focus on the three biggest cloud service providers: AWS, Azure, and Google. Between these three cloud providers alone, different analogies are used for just about every component of services offered.

For example, when you think of a virtual machine (VM), that’s what AWS calls an “instance,” Azure calls a “virtual machine,” and Google calls a “virtual machine instance.” If you have a group of these different machines, or instances, in Amazon and Google they’re called “auto-scaling” groups, whereas in Azure they’re called “scale sets.” There’s also different terminology for their pricing models. AWS offers on-demand instances, Azure calls it “pay as you go,” and Google refers to it as “sustained use.” You’ve also got “reserved instances” in AWS, “reserved VM instances” in Azure, and “committed use” in Google. And you have spot instances in AWS, which are the same as low-priority VMs in Azure, and preemptible instances in Google.

2 – There’s a multitude of variables

Operating systems, compute, network, memory, and disk space are all different factors that go into the pricing and sizing of these instances. Each of these virtual machine instances also have different categories: general purpose, compute optimized, memory optimized, disk optimized and other various types. Then, within each of these different instance types, there are different families. In AWS, the cheapest and smallest instances are in the “t2” family, in Azure they’re called the “A” family. On top of that, there are different generations within each of those families, so in AWS there’s t2, t3, m2, m3, m4, and within each of those processor families, different sizes (small, medium, large, and extra large). So there are lots of different options available. Oh, and lots confusion, too.  

3 – It’s hard to see what you’re spending

If you aren’t familiar with AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud’s consoles or dashboards, it can be hard to find what you’re looking for. To find specific features, you really need to dig in, but even just trying to figure out the basics of how much you’re currently spending, and predicting how much you will be spending – all can be very hard to understand. You can go with the option of building your own dashboard by pulling in from their APIs, but that takes a lot of upfront effort, or you can purchase an external tool to manage overall cost and spending.

4 – It’s based on what you provision…not what you use

Cloud services pricing can charge on a per-hour, per-minute, or per-second basis. If you’re used to the on-prem model where you just deploy things and leave them running 24/7, then you may not be used to this kind of pricing model. But when you move to the cloud’s on-demand pricing models, everything is based on the amount of time you use it.

When you’re charged per hour, it might seem like 6 cents per hour is not that much, but after running instances for 730 hours in a month, it turns out to be a lot of money. This leads to another sub-point: the bill you get at the end of the month doesn’t come until 5 days after the month ends, and it’s not until that point that you get to see what you’ve used. As you’re using instances (or VMs) during the time you need them, you don’t really think about turning them off or even losing servers. We’ve had customers who have servers in different regions, or on different accounts that don’t get checked regularly, and they didn’t even realize they’ve been running all this time, charging up bill after bill.

You might also be overprovisioning or oversizing resources — for example, provisioning multiple extra large instances thinking you might need them someday or use them down the line. If you’re used to that, and overprovisioning everything by twice as much as you need, it can really come back to bite you when you go look at the bill and you’ve been running resources without utilizing them, but are still getting charged for them – constantly.

5 – They change the pricing frequently

Cloud services pricing has changed quite often. So far, they have been trending downward, so things have been getting cheaper over time due to factors like competition and increased utilization of data centers in their space. However, don’t jump to conclude that price changes will never go up.

Frequent price changes make it hard to map out usage and costs over time. Amazon has already made changes to their price more than 60 times since they’ve been around, making it hard for users to plan a long-term approach. Also for some of these instances, if you have them deployed for a long time, the prices of instances don’t display in a way that is easy to track, so you may not even realize that there’s been a price change if you’ve been running the same instances on a consistent basis.

6 – They offer cost savings options… but they’re difficult to understand (or implement)

In AWS, there are some cost savings measures available for shutting things down on a schedule, but in order to run them you need to be familiar with Amazon’s internal tools like Lambda and RDS. If you’re not already familiar, it may be difficult to actually implement this just for the sake of getting things to turn off on a schedule.  

One of the other things you can use in AWS is Reserved Instances, or with Azure you can pay upfront for a full year or two years. The problem: you need to plan ahead for the next 12 to 24 months and know exactly what you’re going to use over that time, which sort of goes against the nature of cloud as a dynamic environment where you can just use what you need. Not to mention, going back to point #2, the obscure terminology for spot instances, reserved instances, and what the different sizes are.

7 – Each service is billed in a different way

Cloud services pricing shifts between IaaS (infrastructure as a service), which uses VMs that are billed one way, and PaaS (platform as a service) gets billed another way. Different mechanisms for billing can be very confusing as you start expanding into different services that cloud providers offer.

As an example, the Lambda functions in AWS are charged based on the number of requests for your functions, the duration, and the time it takes for your code to execute. The Lambda free tier includes 1M free requests per month and 400,000 GB-seconds of compute time per month, or you can get 1M request free and $0.20 per 1M requests thereafter, OR use “duration” tier and get 400,000 GB-seconds per month free, $0.00001667 for every GB-second used thereafter – simple, right? Not so much.

Another example comes from the databases you can run in Azure. Databases can run as a single server or can be priced by elastic pools, each with different tables based on the type of database, then priced by storage, number of databases, etc.

With Google Kubernetes clusters, you’re getting charged per node in the cluster, and each node is charged based on size. Nodes are auto-scaled, so price will go up and down based on the amount that you need. Once again, there’s no easy way of knowing how much you use or how much you need, making it hard to plan ahead.

What can you do about it?

Ultimately, cloud service offerings are there to help enterprises save money on their infrastructures, and they’re great options IF you know how to use them. To optimize your cloud environment and save money on costs, we have a few suggestions:

    • Get a single view of your billing. You can write your own scripts (but that’s not the best answer) or use an external tool.  
    • Understand how each of the services you use is billed. Download the bill, look through it, and work with your team to understand how you’re being billed.
    • Make sure you’re not running anything you shouldn’t be. Shut things down when you don’t need them, like dev and test instance on nights and weekends.Try to plan out as much as you can in advance.
    • Review regularly to plan out usage and schedules as much as you can in advance
    • Put governance measures in place so that users can only access certain features, regions, and limits within the environment. 

Cloud services pricing is tricky, complicated, and hard to understand. Don’t let this confusion affect your monthly cloud bill. Try ParkMyCloud for an automated solution to cost control.

ParkMyCloud’s Top 5 Blog Posts of 2017

ParkMyCloud’s Top 5 Blog Posts of 2017

Before we ring in the new year, ParkMyCloud is taking a look back at 2017. We get a lot of great feedback on our blogs so we decided to summarize our top 5 blog posts, as indicated by our readers (views and shares). In case you missed them, please take a moment and enjoy our most popular posts of 2017!  

Azure vs AWS 2017: Is Azure really surpassing AWS?

Azure vs AWS – what’s the deal? After both cloud providers reported their quarterly earnings at the same time, speculation grew as to whether Azure might have a shot at outpacing Amazon. Provocative headlines teased the idea that Azure is catching up with AWS, making it a great opportunity to compare two out of the ‘big three’ providers. While it may seem like AWS is the one to beat, this blog examines whether Azure is catching up, where they are gaining ground, and why the debate even matters.

AWS vs Google Cloud Pricing – A Comprehensive Look

When it comes to comparing cloud providers, a look at pricing is not only helpful, it’s imperative. AWS and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) use different terminology for their instances, different categories of compute sizing, and take marketing liberties in describing their offerings. To make matters even more confusing, each provider takes a different approach to pricing, charging you by the hour in some cases or by the minute in others, and both having minimums. This blog breaks down all of the jargon and gives you valuable insight into how AWS and GCP are charging you on their monthly cloud bill.

The Cloud Waste Problem That’s Killing Your Business (And What To Do About It)

As enterprises continue shifting to the cloud, service providers like AWS, GCP, Azure, and more offer cloud services as a valuable utility for cost savings. However, as a utility, the cloud has serious potential for waste if not used optimally. What is “cloud waste” and where does it come from? What are the consequences? What can you do to reduce it? This blog answers those burning questions and tells you how to prevent waste and optimize your cloud spend.

Start and Stop RDS Instances – and Schedule with ParkMyCloud

When Amazon announced the release of start and stop RDS instances, AWS users finally had the ability to ‘turn off’ their RDS instances and save money on their cloud bill – nice! However, they would still be charged for provisioned storage, manual snapshots, and automated backup storage. What if there was a solution to starting and stopping RDS instances on an automated schedule, ensuring that they’re not left running when not needed? This blog explains how ParkMyCloud offers automated cost control on a schedule, saving you even more on your monthly cloud bill.

Why We Love the AWS IoT Button

We talk a lot about how ParkMyCloud can save you money on your cloud bill, because we can, but we also love to share the exciting, fun, and innovative offerings that the could brings. The AWS IoT button is a device like no other. You can program it to integrate with any internet-connected device, opening up a whole world of possibilities for what you can do with it. Make a remote control for Netflix, brew coffee in the morning without getting out of bed, or place a takeout order for lunch, all with the push of a button. This blog tells you about how the button was created, how to use it, and some ways that creative developers are using the AWS IoT button.

To another great year…

As we wrap up 2017, the ParkMyCloud team is especially thankful to those of you who have made our blog and our Cloud Cost Control platform successful. We look forward to another great year of keeping up with the cloud, sharing our posts, and of course, saving you money on your cloud bill.

Cheers to 2018! Happy New Year from the ParkMyCloud team and keep an eye open for SmartParking and several great announcements in early January.    

3 Enterprise Cloud Management Challenges You Should Be Thinking About

3 Enterprise Cloud Management Challenges You Should Be Thinking About

Enterprise cloud management is a top priority. As the shift towards multi-cloud environments continues, so has the need to consider the potential challenges. Whether you already use the public cloud, or are considering making the switch, you probably want to know what the risks are. Here are three you should be thinking about.

1. Multi-Cloud Environments

As the ParkMyCloud platform supports AWS, Azure, and Google, we’ve noticed that multi-cloud strategies are becoming increasingly common among enterprises. There are a number of reasons why it would be beneficial to utilize more than one cloud provider. We have discussed risk mitigation as a common reason, along with price protection and workload optimization. As multi-cloud strategies become more popular, the advantages are clear. However, every strategy comes with its challenges, and it’s important for CIOs to be aware of the associated risks.

Without the use of cloud management tools, multi-cloud management is complex and sometimes difficult to navigate. Different cloud providers have different price models, product features, APIs, and terminology. Compliance requirements are also a factor that must be considered when dealing with multiple providers. Meeting and maintaining requirements for one cloud provider is complicated enough, let alone multiple. And don’t forget you need a single pane to view your multi-cloud infrastructure.

2. Cost Control

Cost control is a first priority among cloud computing trends. Enterprise Management Associates (EMA) conducted a research study and identified key reasons why there is a need for cloud cost control, among them were inefficient use of cloud resources, unpredictable billing, and contractual obligation or technological dependency.

Managing your cloud environment and controlling costs requires a great deal of time and strategy, taking away from the initiatives your enterprise really needs to be focusing on. The good news is that we offer a solution to cost control that will save 65% or more on your monthly cloud bills – just by simply parking your idle cloud resources. ParkMyCloud was one of the top three vendors recommended by EMA as a Rapid ROI Utility. If you’re interested in seeing why, we offer a 14-day free trial.

3. Security & Governance

In discussing a multi-cloud strategy and its challenges, the bigger picture also includes security and governance. As we have mentioned, a multi-cloud environment is complex, complicated, and requires native or 3rd party tools to maintain vigilance. Aside from legal compliance based on the industry your company is in, the cloud also comes with standard security issues and of course the possibility of cloud breaches. In this vein, as we talk to customers they often worry about too many users being granted console access to create and terminate cloud resources which can lead to waste. A key here is limiting user access based on roles or Role-based Access Controls (RBAC). At ParkMyCloud we recognize that visibility and control is important in today’s complex cloud world. That’s why in designing our platform, we provide the sysadmin the ability to delegate access based on a user’s role and the ability to authenticate leveraging SSO using SAML integration . This approach brings security benefits without losing the appeal of a multi-cloud strategy.

Our Solution

Enterprise cloud management is an inevitable priority as the shift towards a multi-cloud environment continues. Multiple cloud services add complexity to the challenges of IT and cloud management. Cost control is time consuming and needs to be automated and monitored constantly. Security and governance is a must and it’s necessary to ensure that users and resources are optimally governed. As the need for cloud management continues to grow, cloud automation tools like ParkMyCloud provide a means to effectively manage cloud resources, minimize challenges, and save you money.

Managing Microsoft Azure VMs with ParkMyCloud

Managing Microsoft Azure VMs with ParkMyCloud

Microsoft has made it easy for companies to get started using Microsoft Azure VMs for development and beyond. However, as an organization’s usage grows past a few servers, it becomes necessary to manage both costs and users and can become complex quickly. ParkMyCloud simplifies cloud management of Microsoft Azure VMs by giving you options to create teams of users, groups of instances, and schedule resources easily.

Consider the case of a large Australian financial institution that uses Microsoft Azure as its sole cloud provider. In this case, they currently they have 125 VMs, costing them over $100k on their monthly cloud bill with Microsoft. Their compute spend is about 95% of their total Azure bill.

Using one Azure account for the entire organization, they chose to split it into multiple divisions, such as DEV, UAT, Prod, and DR. These divisions are then split further into multiple applications that run within each division. In order for them to use ParkMyCloud to best optimize their cloud costs, they created teams of users (one per division). They gave each team permissions in order to allow shutdown and startup of individual applications/VMs. A few select admin users have the ability to control all VMs, regardless of where the applications are placed.

The organization also required specific startup/shutdown ordering for their servers. How would ParkMyCloud handle this need? This looks like a perfect use case for logical groups in ParkMyCloud.

For detailed instructions on how to manage logical groups with ParkMyCloud, see our user guide.

Putting this into context, let’s say that you have a DB and a web server grouped together. You want the DB to start first and stop last, therefore you would need to set the DB to have a start delay of 0 and a stop delay of 5. For the web server, you would set a start delay of 5 and stop delay of 0.

Of course, you could also manage logical groups of Microsoft Azure VMs with tags, scripts, and Azure automation. However, we know firsthand that the alternative solution involves complexities and requires constant upkeep – and who wants that?

ParkMyCloud offers the advantage of not only to cutting your cloud costs, but also making cloud management simpler, easier, and more effective. To experience all great the benefits of our platform, start a free trial today!  

Cloud Optimization Tools = Cloud Cost Control (Part II)

Cloud Optimization Tools = Cloud Cost Control (Part II)

A couple of weeks ago in Part 1 of this blog topic we discussed the need for cloud optimization tools to help enterprises with the problem of cloud cost control. Amazon Web Services (AWS) even goes as far as suggesting the following simple steps to control their costs (which can also be applied  to Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform, but of course with slightly different terminology):

    1. Right-size your services to meet capacity needs at the lowest cost;
    2. Save money when you reserve;
    3. Use the spot market;
    4. Monitor and track service usage;
    5. Use Cost Explorer to optimize savings; and
    6. Turn off idle instances (we added this one).

A variety of third-party tools and services have popped up in the market over the past few years to help with cloud cost optimization – why? Because upwards of $23B was spent on public cloud infrastructure in 2016, and spending continues to grow at a rate of 40% per year. Furthermore, depending on who you talk to, roughly 25% of public cloud spend is wasted or not optimized — that’s a huge market! If left unchecked, this waste problem is supposed to triple to over $20B by 2020 – enter the vultures (full disclosure, we are also a vulture, but the nice kind). Most of these tools are lumped under the Cloud Management category, which includes subcategories like Cost Visibility and Governance, Cost Optimization, and Cost Control vendors – we are a cost control vendor to be sure.

Why do you, an enterprise, care? Because there are very unique and subtle differences between the tools that fit into these categories, so your use case should dictate where you go for what – and that’s what I am trying to help you with. So, why am I a credible source to write about this (and not just because ParkMyCloud is the best thing since sliced bread)?

Well, yesterday we had a demo with a FinTech company in California that was interested in Cost Control, or thought they were. It turns out that what they were actually interested in was Cost Visibility and Reporting; the folks we talked to were in Engineering Finance, so their concerns were primarily with billing metrics, business unit chargeback for cloud usage, RI management, and dials and widgets to view all stuff AWS and GCP billing related. Instead of trying to force a square peg into a round hole, we passed them on to a company in this space who’s better suited to solve their immediate needs. In response, the Finance folks are going to put us in touch with the FinTech Cloud Ops folks who care about automating their cloud cost control as part of their DevOps processes.

This type of situation happens more often than not. We have a lot of enterprise customers using ParkMyCloud along with CloudHealth, CloudChekr, Cloudability, and Cloudyn because in general, they provide Cost Visibility and Governance, and we provide actionable, automated Cost Control.

As this is our blog, and my view from the street – we have 200+ customers now using ParkMyCloud, and we demo to 5-10 enterprises per week. Based on a couple of generic customer uses cases where we have strong familiarity, here’s what you need to know to stay ahead of the game:

  • Cost Visibility and Governance: CloudHealth, CloudChekr, Cloudability and Cloudyn (now owned by Microsoft)
  • Reserved Instance (RI) management – all of the above
  • Spot Instance management – SpotInst
  • Monitor and Track Usage: CloudHealth, CloudChekr, Cloudability and Cloudyn
  • Turn off (park) Idle Resources – ParkMyCloud, Skeddly, Gorilla Stack, BotMetric
  • Automate Cost Control as part of your DevOps Process: ParkMyCloud
  • Govern User Access to Cloud Console for Start/Stop: ParkMyCloud
  • Integrate with Single Sign-On (SSO) for Federated User Access: ParkMyCloud

To summarize, cloud cost control is important, and there are many cloud optimization tools available to assist with visibility, governance, management, and control of your single or multi-cloud environments. However, there are very few tools which allow you to set up automated actions leveraging your existing enterprise tools like Ping, Okta, Atlassian, Jenkins, and Slack.  Make sure you are not only focusing on cost visibility and recommendations, but also on action-oriented platforms to really get the best bang for your buck.