Over the past couple of months, we have seen a lot of articles about the Big Three cloud providers and their efforts to be environmentally friendly and make cloud computing green. What are Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) doing to make their IaaS services as green as possible? Does moving to the cloud help enterprises with their green initiatives and use of renewable energy?

It seems the cloud providers are focused on using renewable energy like solar and wind to power their massive data centers and are very actively touting that fact.

For example, Microsoft recently announced a new renewable energy initiative, the Sunseap project. This project, Microsoft’s first Asian clean energy deal, will install solar panels on hundreds of rooftops in Singapore, which they claim will generate 60MW to power Microsoft’s Singapore datacenter — making Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and numerous other cloud services. This deal is the third international clean energy announcement, following two wind deals announced in Ireland and The Netherlands in 2017. That’s pretty cool in my book, so kudos to them.

Google made a similar announcement recently, albeit a little more general, where they tout that Google is now buying enough renewable energy to match the power used in its data centers and offices. Google said that last year its total purchase of energy from sources including wind and solar exceeded the amount of electricity used by its operations around the world. According to a recent blog written by Google, they are the first public cloud, and company of their size, to have achieved that feat, so says Urs Hölzle, Google’s senior vice president of technical infrastructure. Now we can’t verify this but let’s take them at face value given the data in the chart below:

One observation we have in looking at this chart – where are IBM and Oracle? Once again, the Big Three always seem to be several steps ahead.

Speaking of, we’ve looked at Microsoft and Google, what about AWS? According to AWS’s self-reports, it seems that they are behind both Google and Microsoft in terms of relying 100% on renewable energy. AWS states a long-term commitment to achieve 100% renewable energy usage for their global infrastructure footprint, and had set a goal to be powered by 50% renewable energy by the end of 2017 (we could not find a recent 2018 update).

Moving to the cloud has many benefits – time to market, agility, innovation, lower upfront cost, and the commitment to renewable energy.! There’s one other way for cloud computing to be more sustainable – and that’s by all of us using fewer resources. In our small little way, ParkMyCloud helps – we help you turn cloud stuff off when its not being used, kind of like following your kids around the house and shutting off the lights, your at-home green initiative – you know you can automate that using Nest, right? Saving money in the process? That’s a win-win.

About Jay Chapel

Jay Chapel is the CEO and co-founder of ParkMyCloud. After spending several years in the cloud management space, Jay saw that there was no simple solution to the problem of wasted cloud spend - which led him to start ParkMyCloud in 2015. Before that, he spent 10+ years with Micromuse and IBM Tivoli, a provider of business infrastructure management software. After an acquisition by IBM, he led the successful sales integration and subsequent growth of the IBM Tivoli/Netcool business in Europe. He also held several regional and worldwide sales roles in Switzerland, the UK and the US. Jay earned both a BA in Finance and an MBA from West Virginia. Those few hours a month that Jay’s not busy with ParkMyCloud’s growth and success, you can find him on the ski slopes, on the soccer field, or on the golf course often accompanied by his three kids.

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