Why ParkMyCloud Uses ParkMyCloud: A Story

Why ParkMyCloud Uses ParkMyCloud: A Story of the Importance of Drinking Your Own Champagne

drinking-our-own-champagneI think most people can agree that eating your own dog food – or drinking your own champagne, to the glass-half-full crowd – is a hallmark of a business that has created a successful product. The opposite is clearly true: when Alan Mullaly was brought in to Ford, he knew there was a problem when he was picked up from the airport in a Land Rover rather than a Ford car – and when he couldn’t find a single Ford vehicle in the executive parking garage.

For those of us in the software world, there’s another piece to that picture. To tell you how we discovered this for ourselves, I’m going to tell you a story.

It was six weeks after ParkMyCloud’s founding. We had the very first beta version of the product at our fingertips – but before sending it out to beta testers, we gathered the ParkMyCloud team in a conference room to do a bit of usability testing for ourselves. I created a ParkMyCloud user account and hooked up our AWS account so there would be instances to display.

“Now try it out, and let me know if you see any problems,” I told the group.

Heads down, focused on laptops, everyone diligently began to click around, playing with the first generation dashboard and parking schedule interface. For a moment, the room was quiet. Then a chorus went around.

“Hey, what happened?”

“Is anyone else getting this error?”

All at once, everyone around the table lost access to the application. It was gone. For a minute, we were left scratching our heads.

“Okay, what was everyone doing just before it shut down? Did anyone park anything?”

Finally, a sheepish marketing contractor spoke up. “I may have parked an instance.”

As it turned out, he had parked a production server. In particular, the production server running the ParkMyCloud application. D’oh!

Apparently, we needed governance. And we needed it fast. We got to work, and soon after, we released a version of ParkMyCloud that allowed for multiple users and teams for each ParkMyCloud account, all governed with role-based access control (RBAC).

We still use those roles today (incidentally, the “demo” team does not have access to production servers).

The lesson here is that using your application for yourself uncovers important usability issues. Some of these can’t be discovered as quickly as the one above, but only over time – like awkward flows, and reports that skip over meaningful data.

But of course, we also get the same benefits that the product gives to our customers – like saving money. In fact, after the approach was suggested to us by one of our customers, we adopted an “always off” schedule for ourselves. All of our non-production servers are parked 24×7. When our developers need to use them, they log in to ParkMyCloud and “snooze” the schedules for the length of time they need to use them.

This eliminates the need for central schedules, which works especially well for our multi-time-zone development team. Using this schedule, we save about 81% on our non-production servers.

I would encourage anyone who creates products to lead by example and use your product internally — and I assure potential ParkMyCloud customers that we drink our own champagne every day.


About Dale Wickizer

Dale brings over 30 years of technology and engineering experience to his role as co-founder and Chief Technology Office (CTO) at ParkMyCloud. After experiencing the problem of growing cloud spend first-hand, and discovering that there was no simple way to solve it, Dale teamed up with co-founder Jay Chapel to create ParkMyCloud to solve the problem of cloud waste. Before founding ParkMyCloud, Dale was the CTO of the U.S. Public Sector at NetApp, Inc. where he set the future technology and product direction and managed key customer relationships. Prior to NetApp, Dale was an Associate Partner and IT Infrastructure Architect at Accenture, where he helped large enterprises plan and execute IT transformations, data center consolidations, and application deployments. Dale holds both a Bachelor's and a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He and his wife, Barbara, reside in Springfield, VA.

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