There is a growing job function among companies using public cloud: the Enterprise Cloud Manager. We did a study on ParkMyCloud users which showed that a growing proportion of them have “cloud” or the name of their cloud provider such as “AWS” in their job title. This indicates a growing degree of specialization for individuals who manage cloud infrastructure as demonstrated by their cloud computing job titles.  And, in some companies, there is a dedicated role for cloud management – such as an Enterprise Cloud Manager.

Why would you need an Enterprise Cloud Manager?

The world of cloud management is constantly changing and becoming increasingly complex even for the best cloud manager. Recently, the increased adoption of hybrid and multi-cloud environments by organizations to take advantage of best-of-breed solutions, make it more confusing, expensive, and even harder to control. If someone is not fully versed in this field, they may not always know how to handle problems related to governance, security, and cost control. It is important to dedicate resources in your organization to cloud management and related cloud job roles. This chart from Gartner gives us a look at all the things that are involved in cloud management so we can better understand how many parts need to come together for it to run smoothly.



Having a role in your organization that is dedicated to cloud management allows others, who are not specialized in that field, to focus on their jobs, while also centralizing responsibility.  With the help of an Enterprise Cloud Manager, responsibilities are delegated appropriately to ensure cloud environments are handled according to best practices in governance, security, and cost control.

After all, just because you adopt public cloud infrastructure does not mean you have addressed any governance or cost issues – which seems rather obvious when you consider that there are sub-industries created around addressing these problems, but you’d be surprised how often eager adopters assume the technology will do the work and forget that cloud management is not a technological but a human behavior problem.

And someone has to be there to bring the motivational bagels to the “you really need to turn your instances off” meeting.

A Larger Approach: The Cloud Center of Excellence

Cohesively, businesses with a presence in the cloud, regardless of their size, should also consider adopting the functionalities of a Cloud Center of Excellence (CCoE) – which, if the resources are available, can be like an entire department of  Enterprise Cloud Managers. Essentially, a CCoE brings together cross-functional teams to manage cloud strategy, governance, and best practices, and serve as cloud leaders for the entire organization.

The role of an Enterprise Cloud Manager or cloud center of excellence (or cloud operations center or cloud enablement team, whatever you want to call it)  is to oversee cloud operations. They know all the ins and outs of cloud management so they are able to create processes for resource provisioning and services. Their focus is on optimizing their infrastructure which will help streamline all their cloud operations, improve productivity, and optimize cloud costs. 

Moreover, the Enterprise Cloud Manager can systematize the foundation that creates a CCoE with some key guiding principles like the ones outlined by AWS Cloud Center of Excellence here.  

With the Enterprise Cloud Manager leadership, DevOps, CloudOps, Infrastructure, and Finance teams within the CCoE can ensure that the organization’s diverse set of business units are using a common set of best practices to spearhead their cloud efforts while keeping balanced working relationships, operational efficiency, and innovative thinking needed to achieve organizational goals. 

A Note on Job Titles

It’s worth noting that while descriptive, the “Enterprise Cloud Manager” title isn’t necessarily something widely adopted. We’ve run across folks with titles in Cloud Manager, Cloud Operations Manager, Cloud Project Manager, Cloud Infrastructure Manager, Cloud Delivery Manager, etc.

If you’re on the job hunt, we have a few other ideas for cloud and AWS jobs for you to check out.

Automation Tools are Essential

With so much going on in this space, it isn’t possible to expect just one person or a team to manage all of this by hand – you need automation tools. The great thing is that these tools deliver tangible results that make automation a key component for successful enterprise cloud operations and work for companies of any size. Primary users can be people dedicated to this full time, such as an Enterprise Cloud Manager, as well as people managing cloud infrastructure on top of other responsibilities.

Why are these tools important? They provide two main things: visibility and action to act on those recommendations. (That is, unless you’re willing to let go of the steering wheel and let the platform make the decisions – but most folks aren’t, yet.) Customers that were once managing resources manually are now saving time and money by implementing an automation tool. Take a look at the automation tools that are set up through your cloud vendor, as well as third-party tools that are available for cost optimization and beyond. Setting up these tools for automation will lessen the need for routine check-ins and maintenance while ensuring your infrastructure is optimized. 

Do we really need this role?

To put it simply, if you have more than a handful of cloud instances: yes. If you’re small, it may be part of someone’s job description. If you’re large, it may be a center of excellence. 

But if you want your organization to be well informed and up to date, then it is important that you have the organizational roles in place to oversee your cloud operations – an Enterprise Cloud Manager, CCoE and automation tools.

About Jay Chapel

Jay Chapel is the CEO and co-founder of ParkMyCloud. After spending several years in the cloud management space, Jay saw that there was no simple solution to the problem of wasted cloud spend - which led him to start ParkMyCloud in 2015. Before that, he spent 10+ years with Micromuse and IBM Tivoli, a provider of business infrastructure management software. After an acquisition by IBM, he led the successful sales integration and subsequent growth of the IBM Tivoli/Netcool business in Europe. He also held several regional and worldwide sales roles in Switzerland, the UK and the US. Jay earned both a BA in Finance and an MBA from West Virginia. Those few hours a month that Jay’s not busy with ParkMyCloud’s growth and success, you can find him on the ski slopes, on the soccer field, or on the golf course often accompanied by his three kids.