Hitachi ID Systems recently reached their first ParkMyCloud birthday – to celebrate, we chatted with Patrick McMaster about how they optimize training infrastructure and why he and his team said “We honestly couldn’t be happier with ParkMyCloud.”

Can you start by telling me about Hitachi ID Systems and what you and your team do within the company?

Hitachi ID Systems makes identity and access management (IAM) software. I am the training coordinator, so I handle getting clients and potential partners up to speed with how our software works, how to install it, how to administrate it, etc. For those who are more interested in learning about software, we set them up with a virtual environment and course materials or an instructor to get them up to speed with how the software works.

Can you describe how you’re using public cloud?

We use AWS exclusively. When we advertise that we’re running a course a few months ahead of time, our infrastructure starts seeing the registrations and will start creating VMs, applying patches, getting the latest version of the appropriate software installers on the desktop and getting everything ready for the students, who will be accessing geographically-local AWS infrastructure.

In the past, everything for this online training was very manual. We on the training team  would spin up the VMs manually, do the updates manually, and send the information to the potential students., Then when the course was over we would go through and do the reverse – shutting the elements down and turning off the virtual machine on AWS.

What does the supporting training infrastructure in AWS look like?

We have a number of VMs running per student or team that only need to be active during the team’s local business hours, plus some additional supporting infrastructure which is required 24/7. We started to realize as we got more students and began offering self-paced training that our AWS fees were increasing from the 24/7 access we were providing, but also just the management of keeping track of which students are where, when they should be brought into the system, when they should be shut down, etc. We needed to find a solution pretty quickly as we experienced that period of rapid growth.

How did that lead you to finding ParkMyCloud?

We knew we needed to automate the manual processes for this. Of course, lots of organizations tend to come up with solutions internally first. We’re a software company, so we had the talent for that, but we never have enough time. I’ve come to terms more and more every year with the benefits of delegating to the other sources. I realized that we are probably not the first organization to have this problem, so I Googled and found ParkMyCloud.

It became quickly evident that the features that you offered were exactly what we were looking for.

Can you describe your experience as a ParkMyCloud user so far?

Sure! So just before our demo of ParkMyCloud, we were fighting with this issue of trying to figure out how we can manage multiple time zones and multiple geographic locations, and not pay for that time that VMs are just spun up.

Then we went through the ParkMyCloud demo process and started our trial. We connected to our system and looked at ways to set up different schedules and pull information from AWS. There was definitely a moment where everyone in the room looked each other and said, “we must be missing something” – there had to be some additional steps we hadn’t thought out because it seemed too easy to work. But it really was that easy.

It just took a week of monitoring to make sure everything was turning off when it was supposed to – the bulk of our effort was really in that first week, and the time we need to spend in the interface is so small. We can go into ParkMyCloud’s dashboard and make exceptions to the schedule when needed, but the time that we actually spend thinking about these things is now about 2 hours a week, whereas before it was something that members of our staff might struggle with for 1-2 days. It’s been a huge improvement.

We did some calculations just in terms of uptime versus what we were doing before, and having the different schedules at our disposal and being able to spend that one week coming up with every scenario we could come up with was time well-spent. Now there are very few exceptions. I don’t think we’ve had to create a new schedule in a long time. Everything is organized logically, it’s very easy for us to find everything we need.

Who is responsible for tracking your AWS spending in the organization? Have they had any feedback?

Our finance department. Since we started using ParkMyCloud, it’s been very very quiet. No news is good news from finance. We are saving about 40% of our bill.

Do you have any other cloud cost savings measures in place?

Not for this training infrastructure. We have a pretty unique use case here. Our next steps are going to be more towards automatic termination, automatic spinning things up, more time-saving measures rather than cost.

This summer ParkMyCloud is working on instance rightsizing, if that’s something that would be helpful for you.

 That’s definitely something that we could use. We are always trying to find better ways of doing things.

OK, great, thanks Patrick! Appreciate your time.

 Thank you, have a good one!

 

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